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Contains:  NGC 2252, NGC 2244, Rosette nebula, NGC 2239, The star 12Mon
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Rosette Nebula in  BiColor, 





    
        

            Prabhakar

Rosette Nebula in BiColor

Technical card

Imaging telescope or lens:Takahashi FSQ85

Imaging camera:QSI683wsg

Mount:Orion Atlas EQ-G + EQDIR

Guiding telescope or lens:Takahashi FSQ85

Guiding camera:Lodestar

Software:Startools 1.3.5

Filters:Astrodon 3nm OIIIAstrodon 5nm Halpha

Accessory:USB FOCUS USB_focus

Resolution: 3264x2440

Dates:Oct. 31, 2014

Frames:
Astrodon 3nm OIII: 25x600" -20C bin 1x1
Astrodon 5nm Halpha: 30x600" -20C bin 1x1

Integration: 9.2 hours

Darks: ~10

Flats: ~10

Bias: ~20

Avg. Moon age: 7.79 days

Avg. Moon phase: 54.32%

Bortle Dark-Sky Scale: 5.00

Astrometry.net job: 406930

Description

Rosette Nebula (also known as Caldwell 49) is a large, circular H II region located near one end of a giant molecular cloud in the Monoceros region of the Milky Way Galaxy. The open cluster NGC 2244 (Caldwell 50) is closely associated with the nebulosity, the stars of the cluster having been formed from the nebula's matter.

The cluster and nebula lie at a distance of some 5,200 light-years from Earth (although estimates of the distance vary considerably, down to 4,900 light-years.[3]) and measure roughly 130 light years in diameter. The radiation from the young stars excite the atoms in the nebula, causing them to emit radiation themselves producing the emission nebula we see. The mass of the nebula is estimated to be around 10,000 solar masses.

It is believed that stellar winds from a group of O and B stars are exerting pressure on interstellar clouds to cause compression, followed by star formation in the nebula. This star formation is currently still ongoing.

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Image Captured in Weston,FL
V1 - Processed with PixInsight.
V2 - Processed with StarTools
V3 - Ha+OIII mapped to R+G+B=Ha+OIII+OIII

Comments

Author

neomonks
Prabhakar
License: Attribution Creative Commons
5310
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Revisions

  • Rosette Nebula in  BiColor, 





    
        

            Prabhakar
    Original
  • Final
    Rosette Nebula in  BiColor, 





    
        

            Prabhakar
    D
  • Rosette Nebula in  BiColor, 





    
        

            Prabhakar
    E

Histogram

Rosette Nebula in  BiColor, 





    
        

            Prabhakar