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A Matter of Perspective: 3 Views of the Andromeda Galaxy Image 2, 





    
        

            Terry Hancock

A Matter of Perspective: 3 Views of the Andromeda Galaxy Image 2

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Captured from Fremont Michigan in July 2013 using QHY11/TMB92SS

Article by Editor of One-Minute Astronomer Brian Ventrudo oneminuteastronomer.com/10494/three-views-andromeda-galaxy/

Now have a look image #2 the same image, but inverted so that M110 appears on top. It doesn’t look quite right, does it? Of course, it shouldn’t matter with a celestial object whether you see it inverted left-to-right or upside-down, because there’s no frame of reference in space that matters. But for some reason, M31 doesn’t look as visually appealing in this image. Why? I suspect it’s because in image #2 we see the far edge of the galaxy at the bottom and the near edge at the top, but our eyes expect to see the near side on the bottom, like a dinner plate held at arm’s length at a buffet table. When we see the opposite orientation, it looks strange. This effect reminds me of the “crater illusion”. When you look at an image of a impact crater in the usual orientation, the crater appears concave, which of course, it is. But when you look at the same image upside down, the crater appears convex, as if it rises like a hill above the surrounding terrain, which is obviously illusory. If you’re curious, go and Google “crater illusion” to see some example images.

- See more at: oneminuteastronomer.com/10494/three-views-andromeda-galax...

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Terry Hancock
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A Matter of Perspective: 3 Views of the Andromeda Galaxy Image 2, 





    
        

            Terry Hancock