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Contains:  M 5, NGC 5904, The star 5Ser
Getting plate-solving status, please wait...
M5 - Deep Sky West Remote Obsevatory, 





    
        

            Deep Sky West (Ll...
M5 - Deep Sky West Remote Obsevatory

M5 - Deep Sky West Remote Obsevatory

Link to TIFF/FITS: http://www.deepskywest.com

Technical card

Resolution: 3200x3200

Dates:April 1, 2017

Frames:
Astrodon Blue Tru-Balance E-Series Gen 2: 10x120" bin 1x1
Astrodon Blue Tru-Balance E-Series Gen 2: 21x600" bin 1x1
Astrodon Green Tru-Balance E-Series Gen 2: 12x120" bin 1x1
Astrodon Green Tru-Balance E-Series Gen 2: 16x600" bin 1x1
Astrodon Luminance Tru-Balance E-Series Gen 2: 12x60" bin 1x1
Astrodon Luminance Tru-Balance E-Series Gen 2: 25x600" bin 1x1
Astrodon Red Tru-Balance E-Series Gen 2: 25x60" bin 1x1
Astrodon Red Tru-Balance E-Series Gen 2: 16x600" bin 1x1

Integration: 14.4 hours

Avg. Moon age: 4.91 days

Avg. Moon phase: 24.87%

Astrometry.net job: 1519415

RA center: 15h 18' 30"

DEC center: +2° 4' 40"

Pixel scale: 1.051 arcsec/pixel

Orientation: 1.018 degrees

Field radius: 0.660

Locations: Deep Sky West Remote Obsevatory (DSW), Rowe, New Mexico, United States

Description

From Wiki

M5 is, under extremely good conditions, just visible to the naked eye as a faint "star" near the star 5 Serpentis. Binoculars or small telescopes will identify the object as non-stellar while larger telescopes will show some individual stars, of which the brightest are of apparent magnitude 12.2.
M5 was discovered by the German astronomer Gottfried Kirch in 1702 when he was observing a comet. Charles Messier also noted it in 1764, but thought it a nebula without any stars associated with it. William Herschel was the first to resolve individual stars in the cluster in 1791, counting roughly 200.

Comments

Author

sixburg
Deep Sky West (Ll...
License: Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs Creative Commons
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M5 - Deep Sky West Remote Obsevatory, 





    
        

            Deep Sky West (Ll...