Hemisphere:  Northern  ·  Constellation: Taurus (Tau)  ·  Contains:  IC 353  ·  Maia nebula  ·  Merope nebula  ·  NGC 1432  ·  NGC 1435  ·  The star 18Tau  ·  The star 32Tau  ·  The star Atlas (27Tau)  ·  The star Celaeno (16Tau)  ·  The star Electra (17Tau)  ·  The star Merope (23Tau)  ·  The star Pleione (28Tau)  ·  The star Sterope I (21Tau)  ·  The star Taygeta (19Tau)  ·  The star ηTau
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M45 in the dust, 



    
        

            Roberto Colombari
M45 in the dust
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M45 in the dust

Getting plate-solving status, please wait...
M45 in the dust, 



    
        

            Roberto Colombari
M45 in the dust
Powered byPixInsight

M45 in the dust

Technical card


Astrometry.net job: 1910111

RA center: 3h 46' 39"

DEC center: +24° 9' 43"

Pixel scale: 1.997 arcsec/pixel

Orientation: 90.781 degrees

Field radius: 3.726 degrees


Resolution: 1824x1665

Description

Pleiades in the dust

Here in the following a 5 frames mosaic over the Pleiades.

The outstanding data have been collected by Wei-Hao Wang between 2014 and 2015 in Mauna Kea with a Takahashi E180 and D800.

*the data on astrobin are at full resolution*

- 4 fields of view for the outer regions: 22∙180s each

- 1 field of view for the cluster: 103∙180s

Data acquisition: Wei-Hao Wang

Assembling and processing: R. Colombari

____________________________________

Explanation: Have you ever seen the Pleiades star cluster? Even if you have, you probably have never seen it as dusty as this. Perhaps the most famous star cluster on the sky, the bright stars of the Pleiades can be seen without binoculars from even the depths of a light-polluted city. With a long exposure from a dark location, though, the dust cloud surrounding the Pleiades star cluster becomes very evident. Also known as the Seven Sisters and M45, the Pleiades lies about 400 light years away toward the constellation of the Bull (Taurus). A common legend with a modern twist is that one of the brighter stars faded since the cluster was named, leaving only six stars visible to the unaided eye. The actual number of Pleiades stars visible, however, may be more or less than seven, depending on the darkness of the surrounding sky and the clarity of the observer's eyesight.

Source: APOD [reviewed]

Comments

Revisions

  • M45 in the dust, 



    
        

            Roberto Colombari
    Original
  • Final
    M45 in the dust, 



    
        

            Roberto Colombari
    B

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Sky plot

Histogram

M45 in the dust, 



    
        

            Roberto Colombari

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