Hemisphere:  Southern  ·  Constellation: Ophiuchus (Oph)
M14 Globular Cluster, 



    
        

            AlBroxton
M14 Globular Cluster
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M14 Globular Cluster

Equipment

Imaging Telescopes Or Lenses
Celestron C11 Celestron
Imaging Cameras
40D Canon
Mounts
CGEM Celestron
Accessories
6.3 reducer Celestron
Software
photoshop · Deep Sky Stacker · Noel's Tools · 5.00 Images Plus
Guiding Cameras
Orion Star Shooter

Acquisition details

Dates:
May 24, 2011
Frames:
20x60" (20') ISO1600
Integration:
20'
Avg. Moon age:
21.88 days
Avg. Moon phase:
52.80%
Bortle Dark-Sky Scale:
5.00

Basic astrometry details

Astrometry.net job: 3565556

RA center: 17h37m37s.9

DEC center: -03°1149

Pixel scale: 2.593 arcsec/pixel

Orientation: 81.677 degrees

Field radius: 0.387 degrees

Resolution: 900x585

Locations: Leesburg home, Leesburg , Florida, United States

Data source: Backyard

Description

Messier 14 (also known as M14 or NGC 6402) is a globular cluster in the constellation Ophiuchus. It was discovered by Charles Messier in 1764. At a distance of about 30,000 light-years, M14 contains several hundreds of thousands of stars. At an apparent magnitude +7.6 it can be easily observed with binoculars. Medium-sized telescopes will show some hint of the individual stars of which the brightest is of magnitude +14. The total luminosity of M14 is in the order of 400,000 times that of the Sun corresponding to an absolute magnitude of -9.12. The shape of the cluster is decidedly elongated. M14 is about 100 light-years across.

Comments

Revisions

  • M14 Globular Cluster, 



    
        

            AlBroxton
    Original
  • Final
    M14 Globular Cluster, 



    
        

            AlBroxton
    B

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M14 Globular Cluster, 



    
        

            AlBroxton