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Contains:  M 82, NGC 3034, M 81, Bode's nebulae, NGC 3031
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M81 & M82, 





    
        

            Randal Healey
M81 & M82

M81 & M82

Technical card

Resolution: 2993x2109

Dates:March 24, 2018March 25, 2018

Frames:
Astrodon BLUE 36mm - Gen2 E-Series Tru-Balance: 14x300" -20C bin 1x1
Astrodon GREEN 36mm - Gen2 E-Series Tru-Balance: 12x300" -20C bin 1x1
Astrodon HA 36mm - 5nm: 13x600" -20C bin 1x1
Astrodon LUM 36mm - Gen2 E -Series Tru-Balance: 15x600" -20C bin 1x1
Astrodon RED 36mm - Gen2 E-Series Tru-Balance: 12x300" -20C bin 1x1

Integration: 7.8 hours

Darks: ~30

Flats: ~30

Bias: ~75

Avg. Moon age: 7.76 days

Avg. Moon phase: 53.94%

Bortle Dark-Sky Scale: 4.00

Astrometry.net job: 2000374

RA center: 149.065 degrees

DEC center: 69.363 degrees

Pixel scale: 2.305 arcsec/pixel

Orientation: 189.467 degrees

Field radius: 1.172 degrees

Locations: Healey "Utahopia" Observatory, Kaysville, Utah, United States

Data source: Backyard

Description

Messier 81 and Messier 82 galaxies are part of the M81 Group, a group of 34 galaxies in Ursa Major and Camelopardalis constellations. Due to the distance of approximately 12M light years from Earth, this group together with the Local Group (containing the Milky Way) are relative neighbors in the Virgo Supercluster. M81 was discovered initially be Johann Bode (a German astronomer famous for determining the orbit of Uranus) at the end of 1774, hence the alternate name this object is sometimes referred as: Bode's Galaxy. In 1779 Pierre Méchain together with Charles Messier re-discovered the object and included it in the Messier Catalogue. M81 is a grand spiral galaxy with a very active nucleus, "hosting" a super-massive black hole with a mass of around 70 million times the mass of our Sun. Running straight through the disk are some dusty lanes, reminding us of a probably violent past encounter with M82 (estimations are that this encounter happened between 50 and 100 million years ago). Bottom of M81 we can see it's companion, the dwarf irregular galaxy Holmberg IX. M82, sometimes called the Cigar galaxy due to it's edge on view from Earth, is the brightest galaxy in the night sky in infrared light, being a lot brighter in infrared than in the visible part of the spectrum. It is a starburst class galaxy that got caught in a gravitational struggle with M81 for past billion years. M82 is famous for its heavy star forming activity and the outburst of ionized hydrogen.

Comments

Author

RandalHealey
Randal Healey
License: None (All rights reserved)
1530
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Revisions

  • M81 & M82, 





    
        

            Randal Healey
    Original
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  • Final
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    E

Sky plot

Sky plot

Histogram

M81 & M82, 





    
        

            Randal Healey