Hemisphere:  Southern  ·  Constellation: Centaurus (Cen)  ·  Contains:  NGC 5139  ·  omega Cen
Getting plate-solving status, please wait...
NGC 5139 - Omega Centauri, 



    
        

            Gary Imm
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NGC 5139 - Omega Centauri

Getting plate-solving status, please wait...
NGC 5139 - Omega Centauri, 



    
        

            Gary Imm
Powered byPixInsight

NGC 5139 - Omega Centauri

Imaging telescopes or lenses: Takahashi TOA-130NFB

Imaging cameras: ZWO ASI1600MM-Cool

Mounts: Astro-Physics Mach1GTO

Guiding telescopes or lenses: Orion 60mm Guidescope

Guiding cameras: Orion StarShoot AutoGuider Pro Mono

Software: Main Sequence Software Sequence Generator Pro  ·  PixInsight  ·  Stark Labs PHD2 2.6.3

Filters: Astrodon Green 31mm Gen2 I-Series  ·  Astrodon Blue 31mm Gen2 I-Series  ·  Astrodon Red 31mm Gen2 I-Series

Accessory: ZWO EFW  ·  Takahashi Flattener TOA-67  ·  Feathertouch Focuser Boss II Electronic Focusing Control


Dates:May 22, 2018May 23, 2018

Frames:
Astrodon Blue 31mm Gen2 I-Series: 60x60" (1h) (gain: 139.00) -15C bin 1x1
Astrodon Green 31mm Gen2 I-Series: 60x60" (1h) (gain: 139.00) -15C bin 1x1
Astrodon Red 31mm Gen2 I-Series: 60x60" (1h) (gain: 139.00) -15C bin 1x1

Integration: 3h

Avg. Moon age: 8.27 days

Avg. Moon phase: 59.34%


Astrometry.net job: 2078187

RA center: 13h 26' 51"

DEC center: -47° 28' 9"

Pixel scale: 0.785 arcsec/pixel

Orientation: 97.797 degrees

Field radius: 0.544 degrees


Resolution: 4028x2948

Locations: Backyard (Mag 20.8 - Bortle 4.5), Onalaska, Texas, United States

Data source: Backyard

Description

This magnificent object is a globular cluster located 16,000 light years away in the southern sky constellation of Centaurus. One of the few globular clusters visible to the naked eye, it is the largest globular cluster in the Milky Way at a diameter of 150 light-years and is estimated to contain 10 million stars. It is one of the earliest documented deep sky objects, described in 150 A.D. by Ptolemy. The metallicities and ages of this cluster's stars suggest that it may not have formed all at once, and perhaps could be the core remnant of a disrupted dwarf galaxy that has been absorbed by the Milky Way.

Because of its southern declination of -47°, this object only rises 12 degrees above my horizon. I waited for a steady night, but the resulting image is still somewhat blurry. Nevertheless, I am happy to be able to image such a amazing object.

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