Hemisphere:  Southern  ·  Constellation: Tucana (Tuc)  ·  Contains:  IC1662  ·  NGC 346  ·  NGC 371  ·  NGC 456  ·  NGC152  ·  NGC176  ·  NGC220  ·  NGC222  ·  NGC231  ·  NGC242  ·  NGC248  ·  NGC249  ·  NGC256  ·  NGC261  ·  NGC265  ·  NGC267  ·  NGC269  ·  NGC290  ·  NGC292  ·  NGC294  ·  NGC299  ·  NGC306  ·  NGC330  ·  NGC346  ·  NGC361  ·  NGC371  ·  NGC416  ·  NGC419  ·  NGC456  ·  NGC460  ·  And 1 more.
Getting plate-solving status, please wait...
Small Magellanic Cloud Redux, 



    
        

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Small Magellanic Cloud Redux

Getting plate-solving status, please wait...
Small Magellanic Cloud Redux, 



    
        

            Sigga
Powered byPixInsight

Small Magellanic Cloud Redux

Imaging telescopes or lenses: Takahashi FSQ 106ED f/5

Imaging cameras: SBIG STL-11000M

Mounts: Paramount MyT Paramount MyT

Software: DeepSkyStacker (DSS), Raw Therapee, Fitswork, Lightroom

Filters: Astrodon LRGB + Ha

Accessory: Drambuie  ·  Reading Glasses!!!


Dates:Sept. 9, 2018

Frames: 4x300" (20')

Integration: 20'

Avg. Moon age: 29.26 days

Avg. Moon phase: 0.08%


Astrometry.net job: 2266538

RA center: 0h 53' 46"

DEC center: -72° 46' 53"

Pixel scale: 7.011 arcsec/pixel

Orientation: 86.439 degrees

Field radius: 2.269 degrees


Resolution: 1328x1916

Locations: Chile, Coquimbo Region, Chile

Data source: Professional, scientific grade data

Description

The Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), or Nubecula Minor, is a dwarf galaxy near the Milky Way. It is classified as a dwarf irregular galaxy. It has a diameter of about 7,000 light-years, contains several hundred million stars, and has a total mass of approximately 7 billion times the mass of the Sun. The SMC contains a central bar structure and it is speculated that it was once a barred spiral galaxy that was disrupted by the Milky Way to become somewhat irregular. At a distance of about 200,000 light-years, it is one of the Milky Way's nearest intergalactic neighbors. It is also one of the most distant objects that can be seen with the naked eye.

The SMC is mostly visible from the Southern Hemisphere though it can be fully glimpsed from near the southern horizon from equatorial latitudes south of about 15° N. It is located across both the constellations of Tucana and part of Hydrus, appearing as a hazy light patch resembling a detached piece of the Milky Way. It covers an average diameter of about 4.2° across (8 times the Moon's diameter) or 51.7 sq. degrees (about 60 times the apparent area of the Moon.) Since it has a very low surface brightness, the SMC is best seen from a dark site away from city lights. It forms a pair with the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), which lies a further 20° to the east, and like the LMC, is a member of the Local Group and highly probably is a satellite of the Milky Way.

--Wikipedia

I image this object 1 year and two days after previous attempt seen here:

SMC 07 September 2017

Fun experiment and certainly a very cool object, 300 seconds each LRGB. Last year very bright moon, this year none, seems make a difference for sure.

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Small Magellanic Cloud Redux, 



    
        

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