Celestial hemisphere:  Northern  ·  Constellation: Lacerta (Lac)
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LBN 437, Sharpless 126 and HH398, 



    
        

            Ginge Anvik
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LBN 437, Sharpless 126 and HH398

Getting plate-solving status, please wait...
LBN 437, Sharpless 126 and HH398, 



    
        

            Ginge Anvik
Powered byPixInsight

LBN 437, Sharpless 126 and HH398

Acquisition details

Dates:
Sept. 25, 2018
Frames:
Astrodon 5nm Ha: 81×600(13h 30′) -20°C bin 1×1
Astrodon Gen 2 B: 33×600(5h 30′) -20°C bin 1×1
Astrodon Gen 2 G: 21×600(3h 30′) -20°C bin 1×1
Astrodon Gen 2 Lum: 48×600(8h) -20°C
Astrodon Gen 2 R: 19×600(3h 10′) -20°C bin 1×1
Integration:
33h 40′
Darks:
26
Avg. Moon age:
15.13 days
Avg. Moon phase:
99.85%
Bortle Dark-Sky Scale:
1.00

RA center: 22h31m55s.25

DEC center: +40°3936.4

Pixel scale: 1.116 arcsec/pixel

Orientation: 92.177 degrees

Field radius: 1.267 degrees

More info:Open 

Resolution: 6528x4917

File size: 13.6 MB

Locations: Bjarkebu Observatory, Ytre Enebakk, Norway

Data source: Backyard

Description

Sandwiched between Andromeda and Cygnus lies the constellation of Lacerta, the Lizard, but this greyish brown lizard is probably not what the astronomer Johannes Hevelius had in mind when he named the asterism Lacerta in the late 17th century. The reptile-like feature is the globule LBN43, a part of a much bigger molecular cloud extending away from the star 10 Lacertae which from its vantage point outside to the left of the image radiates both the molecular dust and the emission nebula Sh2-126, lighting it up so it looks like the reptile is swimming in red waves. Zooming in on the head of the reptile you can see the X-shaped Herbig-Haro object HH398 and in its center the young star called V375 Lacertae. HH398 consists of turbulent gasses and dust swirling around V375 and from what I read, V375 Lacertae also has bipolar jets, indicating it is feeding on its accretion disk and ejecting material from the poles. The distance from us to these nebulae is somewhat difficult to find as astronomers seem to be in the process of finding that out, the latest estimate being 360±65 parsec. But strewn around in the image can be seen small, fuzzy galaxies that are actually up to 240068900 parsec distant. So at the time the light that hit my sensor left these monsters it would still be another 120 million years or so before the first animals, the sponges appeared on earth.

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LBN 437, Sharpless 126 and HH398, 



    
        

            Ginge Anvik

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