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Contains:  M 81, Bode's nebulae, NGC 3031
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M81 Bode's Galaxy, 





    
        

            Jerry Macon
M81 Bode's Galaxy

M81 Bode's Galaxy

Technical card

Resolution: 4596x3440

Dates:Dec. 8, 2018Dec. 14, 2018

Frames:
Astrodon Gen 2 L 36mm: 125x200" (gain: 99.00) -15C bin 1x1
Astrodon Gen 2 RGB 36mm: 115x200" (gain: 99.00) -20C bin 1x1

Integration: 13.3 hours

Avg. Moon age: 3.81 days

Avg. Moon phase: 21.06%

Bortle Dark-Sky Scale: 4.00

Temperature: -5.00

Astrometry.net job: 2491106

RA center: 148.882 degrees

DEC center: 69.065 degrees

Pixel scale: 0.701 arcsec/pixel

Orientation: 177.543 degrees

Field radius: 0.559 degrees

Locations: Dark Star Observatory, Taos, New Mexico, United States

Data source: Own remote observatory

Remote source: Non-commercial independent facility

Description

Imaged on nights of 2018-12-8, 2018-12-9, 2018-12-11, 2018-12-14.
The RGB were taken on the AG12+ASI1600MM at .70 asec/pix, the L on TV127is+ASI183MM at .75 asec/pix. Using L from the TV NP127is refractor effectively eliminates the spikes from the AG12.

Messier 81 (also known as NGC 3031 or Bode's Galaxy) is a spiral galaxy about 12 million light-years away, with at diameter of 90,000 light years, about half the size of the Milky Way, in the constellation Ursa Major. Due to its proximity to Earth, large size, and active galactic nucleus (which harbors a 70 million M supermassive black hole), Messier 81 has been studied extensively by professional astronomers. The galaxy's large size and relatively high brightness also makes it a popular target for amateur astronomers.
Messier 81 was first discovered by Johann Elert Bode on December 31, 1774.Consequently, the galaxy is sometimes referred to as "Bode's Galaxy". In 1779, Pierre Méchain and Charles Messier reidentified Bode's object, which was subsequently listed in the Messier Catalogue. Messier 81 is located approximately 10° northwest of Alpha Ursae Majoris along with several other galaxies in the Messier 81 Group.

Messier 81 and Messier 82 can both be viewed easily using binoculars and small telescopes. The two objects are generally not observable to the unaided eye, although highly experienced amateur astronomers may be able to see Messier 81 under exceptional observing conditions with a very dark sky. Telescopes with apertures of 8 inches (20 cm) or larger are needed to distinguish structures in the galaxy. Its far northern declination makes it generally visible for observers in the northern hemisphere. It is not visible to most observers in the southern hemisphere, except those in a narrow latitude range immediately south of the equator.
(Wikipedia)

Comments

Author

jmacon
Jerry Macon
License: Attribution Creative Commons
6968
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M81 Bode's Galaxy, 





    
        

            Jerry Macon