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Contains:  M 3, NGC 5272
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M3 Globular Star Cluster, 





    
        

            Randal Healey
M3 Globular Star Cluster

M3 Globular Star Cluster

Technical card

Resolution: 3254x2462

Dates:March 18, 2019March 19, 2019March 20, 2019

Frames:
Astrodon BLUE 36mm - Gen2 E-Series Tru-Balance: 21x300" -20C bin 1x1
Astrodon GREEN 36mm - Gen2 E-Series Tru-Balance: 19x300" -20C bin 1x1
Astrodon LUM 36mm - Gen2 E -Series Tru-Balance: 30x180" -20C bin 1x1
Astrodon RED 36mm - Gen2 E-Series Tru-Balance: 22x300" -20C bin 1x1

Integration: 6.7 hours

Darks: ~50

Flats: ~50

Bias: ~100

Avg. Moon age: 12.96 days

Avg. Moon phase: 95.45%

Astrometry.net job: 2597154

RA center: 205.521 degrees

DEC center: 28.381 degrees

Pixel scale: 1.574 arcsec/pixel

Orientation: 191.364 degrees

Field radius: 0.892 degrees

Locations: Healey "Utahopia" Observatory, Kaysville, Utah, United States

Data source: Own remote observatory

Description

M3 Globular Star Cluster

This is really my first attempt at imaging a star cluster. I hope you enjoy it. Thanks

From APOD: This immense ball of half a million stars older than the Sun lies over 30,000 light-years away. Cataloged as M3 (and NGC 5272), it is one of about 150 globular star clusters that roam the halo of our Milky Way Galaxy. Individual stars are difficult to distinguished in the densely packed core, but colors are apparent for the bright stars on the cluster's outskirts. M3's many cool "red" giant stars take on a yellowish cast, while hotter giants and pulsating variable stars look light blue. A closer look at the deep telescopic view also reveals a host of background galaxies. Itself about 200 light-years across, the giant star cluster is a relatively bright, easy target for binoculars in the northern constellation Canes Venatici, The Hunting Dogs, and not far from Arcturus.

Comments

Author

RandalHealey
Randal Healey
License: None (All rights reserved)
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M3 Globular Star Cluster, 





    
        

            Randal Healey