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Contains:  M 13, Great Cluster in Hercules, NGC 6205
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M-13 The Great Cluster in Hercules, 





    
        

            Randal Healey
M-13 The Great Cluster in Hercules

M-13 The Great Cluster in Hercules

Technical card

Resolution: 3013x2355

Dates:June 2, 2019June 3, 2019June 4, 2019June 5, 2019

Frames:
Astrodon BLUE 36mm - Gen2 E-Series Tru-Balance: 26x180" -20C bin 1x1
Astrodon BLUE 36mm - Gen2 E-Series Tru-Balance: 14x300" -20C bin 1x1
Astrodon GREEN 36mm - Gen2 E-Series Tru-Balance: 22x180" -20C bin 1x1
Astrodon GREEN 36mm - Gen2 E-Series Tru-Balance: 12x300" -20C bin 1x1
Astrodon LUM 36mm - Gen2 E -Series Tru-Balance: 30x180" -20C bin 1x1
Astrodon RED 36mm - Gen2 E-Series Tru-Balance: 25x180" -20C bin 1x1
Astrodon RED 36mm - Gen2 E-Series Tru-Balance: 16x300" 20C bin 1x1

Integration: 8.7 hours

Darks: ~50

Flats: ~50

Bias: ~100

Avg. Moon age: 8.00 days

Avg. Moon phase: 2.00%

Astrometry.net job: 2736949

RA center: 250.416 degrees

DEC center: 36.446 degrees

Pixel scale: 0.838 arcsec/pixel

Orientation: 188.745 degrees

Field radius: 0.445 degrees

Locations: Healey "Utahopia" Observatory, Kaysville, Utah, United States

Data source: Own remote observatory

Description

The Great Cluster in the constellation Hercules – also known as Messier 13, or M13 – is considered to be the finest globular cluster in the northern half of the sky. It’s found within the constellation Hercules – between the two brightest stars of northern spring and summer, Vega and Arcturus.

At mid-northern latitudes, the M13 cluster can be found in the sky for at least part of the night all year round. It’s up part of the night in April, and all night long in May, June and July. In August and September the Hercules cluster is still very much a night owl, staying up till after midnight.

When you gaze at M13 or other globulars, you are looking at stars that are thought to be 12 to 13 billion years old. That’s almost as old as the universe.

M13 is not the easiest of sky objects to spot, but once you find it, you’ll be able to go back to it again and again. It’s located in the constellation Hercules, between summertime’s two brightest stars, Vega and Arcturus.

Comments

Author

RandalHealey
Randal Healey
License: None (All rights reserved)
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M-13 The Great Cluster in Hercules, 





    
        

            Randal Healey