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IC 1396 Bok globules

Technical card

Resolution: 1969x1347

Dates:June 21, 2018June 22, 2018June 23, 2018June 28, 2018June 29, 2018June 7, 2019

Frames:
Astrodon Ha 3nm-31mm: 291x180" (gain: 139.00) -15C bin 1x1
Astrodon OIII 3nm-31mm: 56x180" (gain: 139.00) -15C bin 1x1
Astrodon SII 3nm-31mm: 47x180" (gain: 139.00) bin 1x1

Integration: 19.7 hours

Darks: ~30

Bias: ~50

Avg. Moon age: 10.61 days

Avg. Moon phase: 71.90%

Bortle Dark-Sky Scale: 5.00

Astrometry.net job: 2740833

RA center: 325.926 degrees

DEC center: 56.907 degrees

Pixel scale: 2.306 arcsec/pixel

Orientation: 203.300 degrees

Field radius: 0.764 degrees

Locations: Monterey Pines Observatory, Monterey, California, United States

Data source: Backyard

Description

While the prominent feature of this nebula is the Elephant Truck, I find the smaller Bok globules are exquisite. This image features a collection of those Bok globules found in an area opposite from the Elephant Trunk (if the Trunk is in the south, this area is in the north). This image was a long time coming. I decided to attempt this framing in June 2018, after I collected wide angle data of IC1396. My efforts were thwarted by weather and smoke from fires in 2018. A year later, the night sky cleared for six hours this week and I was finally able the capture the last 5 hours of Ha data I needed to give this a go.

Bok globules were first observed by Bart Bok at Harvard University Observatory in the 1940. He and his colleague, Edith Reilly, hypothesized that they were areas undergoing gravitational collapse that resulted in the formation of new stars. It is now thought that a typical Bok globule is about one light-year across and contains material equivalent to about 10 solar masses. The current theory is that a Bok globule results in double- or multiple-star systems.

Comments

Author

GWLopez
Gary Lopez
License: None (All rights reserved)
3607
Like

Revisions

B

Tweaks to pop the detail in a couple of areas

Sky plot

Sky plot

Histogram

IC 1396 Bok globules, 





    
        

            Gary Lopez