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Jupiter 9th July 2019 - 2 high resolution images taken 2hrs & 10mins apart

Acquisition type: Lucky imaging

Technical card

Resolution: 4000x2666

Date:July 9, 2019

Time: 15:34

Frames: 80000

FPS: 53.00000

Focal length: 9775

Seeing: 4

Transparency: 7

Locations: Home property, Wattle Flat, NSW, Australia

Data source: Backyard

Description

The forecast was for cloud, but strangely it was clear mid evening so I set up to observe and image the transit of the GRS. The seeing was quite variable but it was stable enough to allow me to produce a much better than expected image with the GRS on one limb rotating into view and the Oval BA on the other.
The Oval BA is very light in colour, in fact almost white as others have observed. Some of the ovals in the South Equatorial Belt (SEB) are almost green in colour. There is good resolution from pole to pole in this image.
As the GRS approached the central meridian the seeing suddenly improved dramatically and for this second capture the conditions were amongst the best I have seen and the benefit was the high resolution of detail.
The GRS continues its strange behaviour. There appears to be a flake peeling off on the western side and the Red Spot Hollow (RSH) has been disrupted on this this side. There is also a green coloured streamer to the north of the GRS in centre of the RSH, although it kicks up towards the chimney feature to the north. Is it a stretched out oval similar to the two at right that are approaching this region.
The north part of the GRS is perturbed and there are two brighter areas to the western side.

Comments

Author

macnenia
Niall MacNeill
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Jupiter 9th July 2019 - 2 high resolution images taken 2hrs & 10mins apart, 





    
        

            Niall MacNeill