Hemisphere:  Northern  ·  Constellation: Pegasus (Peg)  ·  Contains:  NGC 7317  ·  NGC 7318  ·  NGC 7319  ·  NGC 7320  ·  Stephan's Quintet
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Stephan's Quintet, 



    
        

            Samuel
Stephan's Quintet
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Stephan's Quintet

Getting plate-solving status, please wait...
Stephan's Quintet, 



    
        

            Samuel
Stephan's Quintet
Powered byPixInsight

Stephan's Quintet

Technical card

Imaging telescopes or lenses: GSO RC8  ·  GSO RC10  ·  GSO RC12

Imaging cameras: Atik 4000

Mounts: Software Bisque Paramount MX

Guiding cameras: Lodestar

Focal reducers: AP CCDT67

Software: PixInsight

Filters: Baader Planetarium B 36mm  ·  Baader Planetarium G 36mm  ·  Baader Planetarium R 36mm  ·  Baader Planetarium L 36mm


Dates:Aug. 26, 2014

Frames: 52x900" (13h)

Integration: 13h

Avg. Moon age: 0.81 days

Avg. Moon phase: 0.73%


Basic astrometry details

Astrometry.net job: 351880

RA center: 22h36m01s

DEC center: +33°5754

Orientation: -3.393 degrees

Field radius: 0.282 degrees


Resolution: 1500x1500

Locations: Observatorio remoto Tomas Lopez en AstroCamp, Nerpio, Albacete, Spain

Data source: Own remote observatory

Remote source: AstroCamp

Description

Stephan's Quintet in the constellation Pegasus is a visual grouping of five galaxies of which four form the first compact galaxy group ever discovered.[2] The group was discovered by Édouard Stephan in 1877 at Marseilles Observatory.[3] The group is the most studied of all the compact galaxy groups.[2] The brightest member of the visual grouping is NGC 7320 that is shown to have extensive H II regions, identified as red blobs, where active star formation is occurring.

These galaxies are of interest because of their violent collisions. Four of the five galaxies in Stephan's Quintet form a physical association, Hickson Compact Group 92, and are involved in a cosmic dance that most likely will end with the galaxies merging. Radio observations in the early 1970s revealed a mysterious filament of emission which lies in inter-galactic space between the galaxies in the group. This same region is also detected in the faint glow of ionized atomic hydrogen seen in the visible part of the spectrum as the magnificent green arc in the picture to the right. Two space telescopes have recently provided new insight into the nature of the strange filament, which is now believed to be a giant intergalactic shock-wave (similar to a sonic boom but traveling in intergalactic gas rather than air) caused by one galaxy (NGC 7318B) falling into the center of the group at several millions of miles per hour.

New shots with RC12 "

Comments

Revisions

  • Stephan's Quintet, 



    
        

            Samuel
    Original
  • Final
    Stephan's Quintet, 



    
        

            Samuel
    B

Sky plot

Sky plot

Histogram

Stephan's Quintet, 



    
        

            Samuel