Celestial hemisphere:  Northern  ·  Constellation: Cassiopeia (Cas)  ·  Contains:  Bubble Nebula  ·  M 52  ·  NGC 7635  ·  NGC 7654
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The Bubble Nebula (NGC 7635) and M52, 



    
        

            Scott Johnson
The Bubble Nebula (NGC 7635) and M52
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The Bubble Nebula (NGC 7635) and M52

Getting plate-solving status, please wait...
The Bubble Nebula (NGC 7635) and M52, 



    
        

            Scott Johnson
The Bubble Nebula (NGC 7635) and M52
Powered byPixInsight

The Bubble Nebula (NGC 7635) and M52

Acquisition details

Dates:
Oct. 23, 2022
Frames:
72×600(12h)
Integration:
12h
Avg. Moon age:
27.52 days
Avg. Moon phase:
4.51%

Basic astrometry details

Astrometry.net job: 6461426

RA center: 23h22m43s.7

DEC center: +61°2038

Pixel scale: 1.487 arcsec/pixel

Orientation: 258.108 degrees

Field radius: 0.876 degrees

Resolution: 3000x3000

File size: 22.0 MB

Data source: Backyard

Description

NGC 7635, also known as the Bubble NebulaSharpless 162, or Caldwell 11, is an H II region[1]emission nebula in the constellation Cassiopeia. It lies close to the direction of the open clusterMessier 52. The "bubble" is created by the stellar wind from a massive hot, 8.7[1]magnitude young central star, SAO 20575 (BD+60°2522).[7] The nebula is near a giant molecular cloud which contains the expansion of the bubble nebula while itself being excited by the hot central star, causing it to glow.[7] It was discovered in 1787 by William Herschel.[5] The star BD+60°2522 is thought to have a mass of about 44 M☉


Messier 52 or M52, also known as NGC 7654, is an open cluster of stars in the highly northern constellation of Cassiopeia. It was discovered by Charles Messier on 1774.[3][a] It can be seen from Earth under a good night sky with binoculars. The brightness of the cluster is influenced by extinction, which is stronger in the southern half.[6] Its metallicity is somewhat below that of the Sun, and is estimated to be [Fe/H] = −0.05 ± 0.01.[7]R. J. Trumplerclassified the cluster appearance as II2r, indicating a rich cluster with little central concentration and a medium range in the brightness of the stars.[8] This was later revised to I2r, denoting a dense core.[6] The cluster has a core radius of 2.97 ± 0.46 ly (0.91 ± 0.14 pc) and a tidal radius of 42.7 ± 7.2 ly (13.1 ± 2.2 pc).[4] It has an estimated age of 158.5 million years[1] and a mass of 1,200 M.[4]The magnitude 8.3 supergiant star BD +60°2532 is a probable member of the cluster,[4] so too 18 candidate slowly pulsating B stars, one being a Delta (δ) Scuti variable, and three candidate Gamma Doradus (γ Dor) variables.[9] There may also be three Be stars.[10] The core of the cluster shows a lack of interstellar matter, which may be due to supernovae explosion(s) early in the cluster's history.[6]

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The Bubble Nebula (NGC 7635) and M52, 



    
        

            Scott Johnson