Celestial hemisphere:  Northern  ·  Constellation: Canis Minor (CMi)  ·  Contains:  PK214+07.1
Getting plate-solving status, please wait...
Abell 20, 



    
        

            Gary Imm
Abell 20, 



    
        

            Gary Imm

Abell 20

Getting plate-solving status, please wait...
Abell 20, 



    
        

            Gary Imm
Abell 20, 



    
        

            Gary Imm

Abell 20

Acquisition details

Dates:
Jan. 7, 2022 ·  Jan. 8, 2022
Frames:
Astrodon Gen2 I-Series Tru-Balance Blue: 30×120(1h) (gain: 120.00) -10°C bin 2×2
Astrodon Gen2 I-Series Tru-Balance Green: 30×120(1h) (gain: 120.00) -10°C bin 2×2
Astrodon Gen2 I-Series Tru-Balance Red: 30×120(1h) (gain: 120.00) -10°C bin 2×2
Astrodon H-alpha 5nm: 24×300(2h) (gain: 200.00) -10°C bin 2×2
Astrodon OIII 3nm: 24×300(2h) (gain: 200.00) -10°C bin 2×2
Integration:
7h
Avg. Moon age:
5.67 days
Avg. Moon phase:
32.29%

RA center: 07h22m57s.688

DEC center: +01°4533.92

Pixel scale: 0.343 arcsec/pixel

Orientation: -3.171 degrees

Field radius: 0.207 degrees

WCS transformation: thin plate spline

More info:Open 

Resolution: 3468x2602

File size: 3.0 MB

Locations: Backyard (Mag 20.8 - Bortle 4.5), Onalaska, Texas, United States

Data source: Backyard

Description

This planetary nebula is located 6500 light years away in the constellation of Canis Minor at a declination of +2 degrees.  It is a magnitude 16.5 PN which spans 1 arc-minute in our apparent view, corresponding to a diameter of 2 light years.

This object is the 20th entry in the Abell Catalog of Planetary Nebulae.  Not to be confused with the Abell Galaxy Cluster Catalog, this PN catalog was created in 1966 by George Abell. It consists of 86 total entries, although only 79 of these entries are now believed to be planetary nebulae.  I have imaged about 60 so far in my Abell PN Collection.

I find this to be one of the most beautiful PN.  The nebula is almost perfectly circular, comprised mainly of OIII with a strong rim around the circumference.  The progenitor star is a perfect match, centered exactly and beaming a bright blue.

The spherical nature of this PN may be due to the progenitor being a single star and not the usual binary.  My collection of other PN that I suspect to be spherical in nature, and developed by a single star, are shown in my Astrobin Spherical PN Collection.

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