Hemisphere:  Northern  ·  Constellation: Pegasus (Peg)  ·  Contains:  NGC 7317  ·  NGC 7318  ·  NGC 7319  ·  NGC 7320  ·  NGC7317  ·  NGC7318  ·  NGC7319  ·  NGC7320  ·  Stephan's Quintet
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Stephan's Quintet and the dark Jovian asteroid 1986TT6, 



    
        

            Carlo Caligiuri
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Stephan's Quintet and the dark Jovian asteroid 1986TT6

Getting plate-solving status, please wait...
Stephan's Quintet and the dark Jovian asteroid 1986TT6, 



    
        

            Carlo Caligiuri
Powered byPixInsight

Stephan's Quintet and the dark Jovian asteroid 1986TT6

Technical card

Mounts: SkyWatcher EQ6

Guiding telescopes or lenses: Meade 50 mm Finder

Guiding cameras: Aptina B%W webcam

Software: Adobe Phosotshop CC  ·  Siril 0.9


Dates:Sept. 21, 2020

Frames: 23x240" (1h 32')

Integration: 1h 32'

Avg. Moon age: 4.63 days

Avg. Moon phase: 22.36%


Astrometry.net job: 4081966

RA center: 22h 36' 1"

DEC center: +33° 57' 57"

Pixel scale: 0.501 arcsec/pixel

Orientation: 99.281 degrees

Field radius: 0.318 degrees


Resolution: 3782x2574

Locations: Osservatorio - K72, Celico, Cosenza, Italy

Data source: Backyard

Description

There is a track! Near the zenit! i said by my self...
With my surprise i discover that in this frame on the left is present the troyan asteroid 1986 TT6.
Confirmed by SkyBoT at http://vo.imcce.fr/webservices/skybot/
Very nice service... just put position, time , geographical location and some other informations and you get any Solar System object that maybe could be present in your picture... great service... i need to wait for a new discover!!! Maybe a comet... but what a challenge!!! :)

Some details from wikipedia of asteroid 1986TT6:

"1986 TT6 is a dark Jovian asteroid orbiting in the leading Greek camp at Jupiter's L4 Lagrangian point, 60° ahead of its orbit in a 1:1 resonance (see Trojans in astronomy). It is also a non-family asteroid in the Jovian background population.[5][12]

It orbits the Sun at a distance of 4.9–5.5 AU once every 11 years and 11 months (4,350 days; semi-major axis of 5.21 AU). Its orbit has an eccentricity of 0.05 and a notably high inclination of 35° with respect to the ecliptic.[2] The asteroid was first observed as 1975 VT5 at Crimea–Nauchnij in November 1975. The body's observation arc begins with its official discovery observation at the Toruń Centre.[1]"

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  • Stephan's Quintet and the dark Jovian asteroid 1986TT6, 



    
        

            Carlo Caligiuri
    Original
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    Stephan's Quintet and the dark Jovian asteroid 1986TT6, 



    
        

            Carlo Caligiuri
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Stephan's Quintet and the dark Jovian asteroid 1986TT6, 



    
        

            Carlo Caligiuri