Celestial hemisphere:  Northern  ·  Constellation: Perseus (Per)  ·  Contains:  B205  ·  LBN 740  ·  LBN 741  ·  LDN 1450  ·  LDN 1452  ·  NGC 1333

Image of the day 11/18/2022

Getting plate-solving status, please wait...
    Revisiting NGC 1333, 



    
        

            Andrew Barton
    Powered byPixInsight

    Revisiting NGC 1333

    Image of the day 11/18/2022

    Getting plate-solving status, please wait...
      Revisiting NGC 1333, 



    
        

            Andrew Barton
      Powered byPixInsight

      Revisiting NGC 1333

      Acquisition details

      Dates:
      Oct. 18, 2022 ·  Oct. 19, 2022 ·  Oct. 20, 2022 ·  Oct. 24, 2022 ·  Oct. 25, 2022 ·  Oct. 28, 2022
      Frames:
      Chroma Blue 50 mm: 244×300(20h 20′) (gain: 0.00) -10°C bin 1×1
      Chroma Green 50 mm: 243×300(20h 15′) (gain: 0.00) -10°C bin 1×1
      Chroma Red 50 mm: 248×300(20h 40′) (gain: 0.00) -10°C bin 1×1
      Integration:
      61h 15′
      Avg. Moon age:
      17.18 days
      Avg. Moon phase:
      18.90%

      RA center: 03h29m05s.122

      DEC center: +31°2005.69

      Pixel scale: 0.841 arcsec/pixel

      Orientation: -47.218 degrees

      Field radius: 0.863 degrees

      WCS transformation: thin plate spline

      More info:Open 

      Resolution: 6165x4070

      File size: 13.1 MB

      Locations: Duquesne, Patagonia, Arizona, United States

      Data source: Backyard

      Description

      I am revisiting one of my favorite targets after five years of additional experience and significant equipment changes. My original https://www.astrobin.com/324613/ (added as a revision to this image for ease of comparison) was taken from Muleshoe Ranch, Arizona, over the course of two nights using a OSC CCD camera and 100mm aperture refractor.

      This latest version was taken from my backyard observatory in remote Duquesne, Arizona. This version was shot from a permanent installation with a 130 mm refractor, a mono CMOS camera with filter wheel and with over 50 hours of data. 

      The two images aren't even in the same league although the first was likely taken from slightly darker skies. I attribute the difference to several factors:
      - imaging with a mono camera with high quality filters vs a OSC camera
      - vast improvements in the quality of CMOS cameras
      - larger aperture telescope
      - longer integration time
      - a significant improvement in the software tools for astrophotography
      - five years more experience doing astrophotography

      At this point I find it hard to believe I will see such significant improvements in image quality over the next five years. But, if you had asked me then what to expect five years in the future it certainly would not have been this. I also see this level of improvement in the works of those I follow on astrobin. The entire field seems to be making this leap together. It's an exciting time to be an astrophotographer!

      Comments

      Revisions

      • Final
        Revisiting NGC 1333, 



    
        

            Andrew Barton
        Original
        Revisiting NGC 1333, 



    
        

            Andrew Barton
        B

      B

      Title: NGC1333 from 2017

      Uploaded: ...

      Sky plot

      Sky plot

      Histogram

      Revisiting NGC 1333, 



    
        

            Andrew Barton