Celestial hemisphere:  Southern  ·  Constellation: Hydra (Hya)  ·  Contains:  PK248+29.1
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Abell 34, 



    
        

            Gary Imm
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Abell 34

Getting plate-solving status, please wait...
Abell 34, 



    
        

            Gary Imm
Powered byPixInsight

Abell 34

Acquisition details

Dates:
Dec. 19, 2019 ·  Feb. 1, 2020 ·  Feb. 2, 2020
Frames:
Astrodon Gen2 I-Series Tru-Balance Blue: 30×120(1h) (gain: 111.00) -20°C bin 1×1
Astrodon Gen2 I-Series Tru-Balance Green: 30×120(1h) (gain: 111.00) -20°C bin 1×1
Astrodon Gen2 I-Series Tru-Balance Red: 30×120(1h) (gain: 111.00) -20°C bin 1×1
Astrodon H-alpha 5nm: 24×300(2h) (gain: 300.00) -20°C bin 1×1
Astrodon OIII 3nm: 24×300(2h) (gain: 300.00) -20°C bin 1×1
Integration:
7h
Avg. Moon age:
12.37 days
Avg. Moon phase:
48.47%

RA center: 09h45m35s.803

DEC center: -13°1013.29

Pixel scale: 0.494 arcsec/pixel

Orientation: -1.371 degrees

Field radius: 0.275 degrees

More info:Open 

Resolution: 3051x2592

File size: 3.4 MB

Locations: Backyard (Mag 20.8 - Bortle 4.5), Onalaska, Texas, United States

Data source: Backyard

Description

This object, also known as PK 248+29.1, is a rarely imaged planetary nebula located 2400 light years away in the constellation of Hydra at a declination of -13 degrees. This 14.5 magnitude PN spans 5 arc-minutes in our apparent view, which corresponds to a diameter of 3 light years.

The OIII signal of this object is stronger than the Ha signal, which gives the object an overall bluish tint. The exception to this is in the two limbs seen at 11 o'clock and 4 o'clock, where the two signals are fairly even resulting in a whitish color. The small bright white patch at 3 o'clock looks like part of this limb but is actually a tiny galaxy (LEDA 3081651) far in the distance. The central progenitor star of the PN is clearly visible in the center as a small blue star.

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