Cookie consent

AstroBin saves small pieces of text information (cookies) on your device in order to deliver better content and for statistical purposes. You can disable the usage of cookies by changing the settings of your browser. By browsing AstroBin without changing the browser settings, you grant us permission to store that information on your device.

I agree

CCD/CMOS with a DSLR lens

tomtom2245
18 Feb, 2019 02:24
I have a question about using my ASI1600MM, or any other non-DSLR camera, with some of my Canon lenses. When using the camera with an automatic lens, one where you have to adjust the aperture in camera, does the aperture default to the widest value? I.e. I have a Sigma Art 18-35 f/1.8 so would the aperture always be f/1.8 when used with my ASI? I also have a manual Samyang 135mm where you can adjust the aperture on the lens itself but I just want sure how it worked with a non-manual lens.
rarahaha2
18 Feb, 2019 07:50
Yes. For automatic lens, here is one trick to adjust the aperture. First you need a DSLR camera, then connect your DSLR camera and your lens. Next, adjust the aperture and push the "depth of field preview" button and remove the lens at the same time. After that, it will be OK! smile
lazypineapple
18 Feb, 2019 14:58
Liu Zhuokai
Yes. For automatic lens, here is one trick to adjust the aperture. First you need a DSLR camera, then connect your DSLR camera and your lens. Next, adjust the aperture and push the "depth of field preview" button and remove the lens at the same time. After that, it will be OK! smile

Does this mean that a Canon lens would be at the last aperture used on the Canon camera?
i did not know this I thought they would go wide open, thanks
2ghouls
18 Feb, 2019 16:36
BJ Jones
Does this mean that a Canon lens would be at the last aperture used on the Canon camera?i did not know this I thought they would go wide open, thanks
Yes, if you use the depth of field button trick that Liu mentioned the Canon lens will stay locked at that aperture. Otherwise it will revert to wide open once removed from the Canon camera. I have used this trick many times with my Canon glass, and can confirm that it does work. Some people still prefer to use aperture masks in front of the glass because they don't like the diffraction pattern from the aperture blades.

One other thing, I've heard online that this trick does NOT work for Nikon.

Cheers, Nico
tomtom2245
19 Feb, 2019 02:27
Thanks everyone!
bobzeq25
19 Feb, 2019 23:57
Another method widely used is  adaptors meant for reducing thread size.  Then you don't see diffraction artifacts from the aperture blades..
 
Register or login to create to post a reply.