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Hubble Legacy Archive or Field Work?

physiks_guy22
18 Jun, 2019 17:20
Hey folks,

I see several pictures from the HLA and they're beautiful, but I have a question. Why do people just snag data from the archive and process it? Isn't it a bit too far removed from the craft? You know, like setting up your gear, calibrating everything, framing the shot, taking exposures and all that, and then processing the data the next day. Isn't that what this is all about? Grabbing data off of the HLA seems like it wouldn't feel like astrophotography anymore. I've never tried. I don't mean to be rude, but I'm just curious about how people decided to do HLA processing only. And how fulfilling it may or may not be. For example, if I were to ever log-on to a remote site and click the mouse a few times and have data in the morning, even that would sort of feel like a let down. There's no substitute for being out under a clear dark sky in the thicket of it all! To let your eyes dark adapt as you scan the heavens while your rig loops through exposures to to be immersed in that calm chilly night air with nothing other than yourself and the Universe…where all worries and stress of your job and finances and relationships melt away and it's just peaceful calm beauty. You sort of let yourself go and become part of the night. Another shadow drifting under the cool glowing light from the early fall Milky Way.
Maurice_Toet
18 Jun, 2019 19:49
John Kroon
There's no substitute for being out under a clear dark sky in the thicket of it all! …
That sums it up for me!
urmymuse
19 Jun, 2019 08:40
I was just looking at the hubble data the other day … weather has been terrible here last few weeks so no opportunity to capture anything. Otherwise largely agree with your sentiments.
whwang
19 Jun, 2019 09:12
It's just a different way to enjoy astronomy.  As a professional astronomer, I love to see more people digging into professional observatories' data archive, processing the images, and sharing the beautiful results with the public.  This is a good way to bring astronomy to more people and is good for the society.

From astrophotography hobbyists' point of view, not everyone can have frequent good weather, or easy access to dark places. Spending time on data that are publicly available is quite understandable. It's also a good exercise.
carastro
19 Jun, 2019 09:48
I have to agree with you John.

Carole
Die_Launische_Diva
19 Jun, 2019 10:25
Processing professional data is another way to enjoy astrophotography, and the best way to see if that option suits you, is to have a try. You may be surprised from how hard that can be.
Snjór
19 Jun, 2019 11:18
Each to own I think. Also here is no dark sky in summer so if wish practice or do images either remote or archive.

Sigga
Starminer68
19 Jun, 2019 13:37
Have to run for a popcorn 🍿 Tricky question with no clear answer. For me using professional observatory data is a steal (sorry for offending my opponents). Unless you are a professional astronomer - keep your own works or your amateur colleagues  (with their permission). But other points of view exist and it is great. smile
fkane
19 Jun, 2019 20:58
I mean, it's certainly rewarding to take raw data and turn it into something beautiful. For those who don't have the location, weather,  time, and/or money required to gather one's own photons, I certainly don't begrudge them enjoying that aspect of astro-imaging.

It just becomes a problem if you start thinking of Astrobin as a competition. Backyard astronomers don't want to be on the same playing field as Hubble. But I actually find those Hubble images useful as a reference to strive toward.
whwang
20 Jun, 2019 08:44
Adel Kildeev
Have to run for a popcorn 🍿 Tricky question with no clear answer. For me using professional observatory data is a steal (sorry for offending my opponents). Unless you are a professional astronomer - keep your own works or your amateur colleagues  (with their permission). But other points of view exist and it is great. smile
I think only taking something without permission is called "steal."  The professional observatories open the archival images to the whole world.  Everyone can download the images without permission as long as the images are found in the public domain.  This is definitely not stealing.
DavideCoverta
20 Jun, 2019 12:57
Adel Kildeev
. For me using professional observatory data is a steal

So pay attention with AB people. You can even "loose" your wallet…  smile
Starminer68
20 Jun, 2019 13:11
Professional observatories equipment is no match to amateur telescopes, so comparing results make no sense. And professional observatories have specific purposes, scientific and very distant from just our amateur photos. Stealing (even with permission) scientific data for own pleasure, removing stars, changing colors etc- sorry, not my field.  smile
DavideCoverta
20 Jun, 2019 13:14
Yeah, very bad people!
Burglars!  smile
Die_Launische_Diva
20 Jun, 2019 13:26
You have forgotten all the algorithms and data reduction procedures we as amateurs steal from professional astronomers! Guilty as charged, your Honor! And for punishment, only eyepieces, pencils and drafting paper is allowed from now on!  smile
Edited 20 Jun, 2019 13:26
 
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