Hemisphere:  Southern  ·  Constellation: Dorado (Dor)  ·  Contains:  NGC 1951  ·  NGC 1955  ·  NGC 1968  ·  NGC 1974  ·  NGC 1978  ·  NGC 2002  ·  NGC 2003  ·  NGC 2004  ·  NGC 2006  ·  NGC 2011  ·  NGC 2014  ·  NGC 2020  ·  NGC 2021  ·  NGC 2027  ·  NGC 2029  ·  NGC 2030  ·  NGC 2032  ·  NGC 2034  ·  NGC 2035  ·  NGC 2040  ·  NGC 2041  ·  NGC 2053
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Bubbles in the Large Magellanic Cloud - 2-Panel Mosaic, 



    
        

            Alex Woronow
Powered byPixInsight

Bubbles in the Large Magellanic Cloud - 2-Panel Mosaic

Getting plate-solving status, please wait...
Bubbles in the Large Magellanic Cloud - 2-Panel Mosaic, 



    
        

            Alex Woronow
Powered byPixInsight

Bubbles in the Large Magellanic Cloud - 2-Panel Mosaic

Acquisition details

RA center: 05h32m29s.45

DEC center: -66°5251.6

Pixel scale: 2.896 arcsec/pixel

Orientation: -84.303 degrees

Field radius: 1.215 degrees

WCS transformation: thin plate spline

More info:Open 

Resolution: 2500x1699

Data source: Amateur hosting facility

Remote source: DeepSkyWest

Description

Bubbles in the Large Magellanic Cloud 2-Panel Mosaic

OTA: TAO 150 (f/7.3)

Camera: FLI - ML16200 (1.13 arcseconds/pixel)

Observatory: Deep Sky West, Chile

EXPOSURES:

Red: 19 x 600 + 22 x 600 sec.

Blue: 23 x 600 + 21 x 600

Green: 25 x 600 + 20 x 600

H 12 x 1800+ 14 x 1800

Total exposure ~34.7 hours

Image Width x Height: ~(2 x 1.3) degs

Processed by Alex Woronow (2019) using PixInsight, Skylum, StarTools, SWT

Within this image lie multiple HII clouds, all of which reside within the Large Magellanic Cloud. Among the various HII clouds is are a number of ‘supershells’ or ‘superbubbles’, which are cavity within a bubble carved out by supernovae and stellar winds. The somewhat bluer clouds (e.g., NGC 2020, and the area around NGC 2040) are reflection nebulae from embedded clusters young, hot stars. The young stars that generated the bubbles are visible in these bubbles. Over the entire image, the tars are so abundant that the entire image has a sandy, grainy appearance. The image includes stars below magnitude 21.54, according to in the catalogs I can access.

Speaking of ‘Superbubbles,’ our solar system lies near the center of an old superbubble, the “Local Bubble”, which is roughly 300 light-years across and contains an average of 1/10 as many atoms/cm3 as the surrounding areas of the Milky Way.

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