Hemisphere:  Northern  ·  Constellation: Monoceros (Mon)  ·  Contains:  NGC 2237  ·  NGC 2238  ·  NGC 2239  ·  Rosette A  ·  Rosette Nebula
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Bok Globules in the Rosette Nebula, 



    
        

            Steve Milne
Bok Globules in the Rosette Nebula
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Bok Globules in the Rosette Nebula

Getting plate-solving status, please wait...
Bok Globules in the Rosette Nebula, 



    
        

            Steve Milne
Bok Globules in the Rosette Nebula
Powered byPixInsight

Bok Globules in the Rosette Nebula

Technical card

Imaging telescopes or lenses: TEC-140

Imaging cameras: QSI 690 WSG-8

Mounts: 10 Micron GM2000 HPS II UP

Guiding telescopes or lenses: TEC-140

Focal reducers: TEC Field Flattener

Software: Pixinsight 1.8  ·  Sequence Generator Pro  ·  Adobe Photoshop 6 CS  ·  Open PHD PHD 2.5

Filters: Astrodon OIII 3nm  ·  Astrodon SII 3nm  ·  Ha 3nm


Dates:Feb. 13, 2021

Frames:
Astrodon OIII 3nm: 24x1200" (8h) bin 1x1
Astrodon SII 3nm: 24x1200" (8h) bin 1x1
Ha 3nm: 38x1200" (12h 40') bin 1x1

Integration: 28h 40'

Avg. Moon age: 1.68 days

Avg. Moon phase: 3.16%


Basic astrometry details

Astrometry.net job: 4299388

RA center: 06h30m59s

DEC center: +05°0130

Pixel scale: 0.744 arcsec/pixel

Orientation: 269.781 degrees

Field radius: 0.445 degrees


Resolution: 3365x2690

Locations: E-EyE, Fregenal de la Sierra, Extremadura, Spain

Data source: Own remote observatory

Remote source: e-EyE Extremadura

Description

The Rosette Nebula (Caldwell 49 and NGC numbers 2237, 2238, 2239, 2244 & 2246) is a large H2 region a little over 5,000 light years away in the constellation of Monoceros. The nebula is around 130 light years in diameter.

This framing of a portion of the nebula concentrates on the Bok globules, named after the Dutch-American astronomer Bart Bok, who in 1947 proposed that these dark nebula indicated clouds of dust undergoing gravitational collapse as part of the process of new star formation. Infrared observations some 50 years later confirmed that this was indeed the case.

We began the Rosette Nebula project on 13 February 2019 and finished photographing it on the same date in 2021.

Capture details are as follows:



Telescope: TEC 140

Camera: QSI 690

Filters: Astrodon

Mount: 10 Micron GM2000HPS

SII: 24 x 1200s

Ha: 38 x 1200s

OIII: 24 x 1200s

A total of 32 hours and 40 minutes exposure.

Data: Steve Milne & Barry Wilson

Processing: Steve Milne

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