Contains:  Solar system body or event
Theophilus and Cyrillus, 



    
        

             Astroavani - Avani Soares

Theophilus and Cyrillus

Theophilus and Cyrillus, 



    
        

             Astroavani - Avani Soares

Theophilus and Cyrillus

Equipment

Imaging Telescopes Or Lenses
Celestron EdgeHD 14"
Imaging Cameras
ZWO ASI290MC
Filters
Baader Planetariun IR Pass 685
Software
AS!2 · Fire Capture

Acquisition details

Resolution: 1248x928

File size: 1018.5 KB

Locations: Observatório Parsec, Canoas, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

Data source: Backyard

Description

With the terminator very close, we can see in full the aggressiveness of the relief in this region.

Unusual mineral spotting some lunar craters should not have come from the depths Moon: A new study suggests that may be remnants of objects crashing into the moon creating craters.

In recent years, the probes orbiting the moon and even some observations based on Earth found signs of olivine and other non-typical magnesium-rich minerals of the moon's crust in the central peaks of Copernicus, as well as Theophilus. Previous studies have suggested that these minerals were excavated beneath the lunar crust, which is about 30 km thick in the Moon side facing the Earth. However, new computer models that simulate the impact of a rich asteroid olivine 7 km in diameter impacting the moon's side facing the Earth show that at lower impact velocities than average (less than about 16 miles per second ), it does not pierce the crust of the moon to exhume the deeper material. Not only that, but speeds below 12 km / s which represents about 25% of all lunar impacts, nearly 50% of the input object can survive the impact and be drawn into the bottom of the crater. So the crater is marked by pieces of the asteroid that span large areas. Another source can be huge asteroids hit the Earth and splashed pieces to the space that later reached the moon. This would allow it to form large deposits material in some places on the moon and was probably what happened at that time called Late Heavy Bombardment.

Source: Astronomy +, Svetla Radeva - NASA

Adaptation and text: Avani Soares

Comments

Histogram

Theophilus and Cyrillus, 



    
        

             Astroavani - Avani Soares