Celestial hemisphere:  Northern  ·  Constellation: Coma Berenices (Com)  ·  Contains:  Black Eye Galaxy  ·  Black-eye galaxy  ·  Evil Eye Galaxy  ·  M 64  ·  NGC 4826
Getting plate-solving status, please wait...
M64, 



    
        

            Gary Imm
M64, 



    
        

            Gary Imm

M64

Getting plate-solving status, please wait...
M64, 



    
        

            Gary Imm
M64, 



    
        

            Gary Imm

M64

Acquisition details

Dates:
March 25, 2022 ·  March 26, 2022
Frames:
Astrodon Gen2 I-Series Tru-Balance Blue: 30×120(1h) (gain: 120.00) -10°C bin 2×2
Astrodon Gen2 I-Series Tru-Balance Green: 30×120(1h) (gain: 120.00) -10°C bin 2×2
Astrodon Gen2 I-Series Tru-Balance Lum: 60×120(2h) (gain: 120.00) -10°C bin 2×2
Astrodon Gen2 I-Series Tru-Balance Red: 30×120(1h) (gain: 120.00) -10°C bin 2×2
Integration:
5h
Avg. Moon age:
22.98 days
Avg. Moon phase:
41.30%

RA center: 12h56m43s.559

DEC center: +21°4055.30

Pixel scale: 0.344 arcsec/pixel

Orientation: 179.163 degrees

Field radius: 0.233 degrees

WCS transformation: thin plate spline

More info:Open 

Resolution: 4029x2752

File size: 3.5 MB

Locations: Backyard (Mag 20.8 - Bortle 4.5), Onalaska, Texas, United States

Data source: Backyard

Description

This Seyfert spiral galaxy is located only 14 million light years away in the constellation of Coma Berenices at a declination of +22 degrees.  It is a magnitude 8.5 galaxy which spans 11 arc-minutes in our apparent view.  This corresponds to a diameter of 50,000 light years.  It appears to us about 30 degrees from edge-on and is the 27th brightest galaxy in the sky.

This galaxy, nicknamed the Black Eye Galaxy, has an impressive meandering wide dust lane which appears strongly on the bottom right (assumed near side) of the core.  The dust lane looks like it is also present but obscured by stars on the upper left side. The outer disk is diffuse, although numerous concentric rings can subtly be seen within the disk.

In the mouseover, I am surprised at how much more blue the Hubble galaxy disk is than my image.  My image is color calibrated using PI’s PCC process and I am sure that the Hubble’s image is color calibrated as well.  In comparing a long list of galaxy images, such as M104, I see a similar trend of the Hubble disks being more blue than my images.  My guess is that this difference is due to the scattering of blue light by the earth's atmosphere.

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Note - Since posting the original image, I have learned about a potential issue with the Pixinsight PCC color calibration process.  This is an updated re-calibrated version, where the disk is more white and less yellow.

Comments

Revisions

  • M64, 



    
        

            Gary Imm
    Original
  • M64, 



    
        

            Gary Imm
    F

F

Description: Comparison to Hubble Image

Uploaded: ...

Sky plot

Sky plot

Histogram

M64, 



    
        

            Gary Imm