Hemisphere:  Northern  ·  Constellation: Andromeda (And)  ·  Contains:  NGC 891  ·  NGC 898  ·  NGC 910  ·  NGC 911  ·  NGC891  ·  NGC898  ·  NGC906  ·  NGC909  ·  NGC910  ·  NGC911  ·  NGC912  ·  NGC913
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ngc 891 and surrounding galaxies, 



    
        

            John Mart
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ngc 891 and surrounding galaxies

Imaging telescopes or lenses: Explorer Scientific ED102

Mounts: SkyWatcher EQ6-R Pro

Guiding telescopes or lenses: ZWO 60/280 Guiderscope

Guiding cameras: ZWO 290MM mini

Software: PinInsight 1.8  ·  SGP

Filters: ZWO G 1.25" optimized for ASI1600  ·  ZWO R 1.25" optimized for ASI1600  ·  ZWO B 1.25" optimized for ASI1600

Accessory: ZWO EAF Electronic Auto Focuser  ·  ZWO EFW 1.25 8 Position  ·  Pegasus Astro Pocket Power Box  ·  Startech Industrial USB3 Hub  ·  QHY PoleMaster PoleMaster


Dates:Nov. 17, 2020

Frames:
ZWO B 1.25" optimized for ASI1600: 10x180" (gain: 139.00) -20C bin 1x1
ZWO G 1.25" optimized for ASI1600: 10x180" (gain: 139.00) -20C bin 1x1
ZWO R 1.25" optimized for ASI1600: 10x180" (gain: 139.00) -20C bin 1x1

Integration: 1.5 hours

Darks: ~30

Flats: ~30

Flat darks: ~30

Avg. Moon age: 2.60 days

Avg. Moon phase: 7.43%

Bortle Dark-Sky Scale: 5.00

Temperature: 15.00


Astrometry.net job: 4134145

RA center: 2h 22' 34"

DEC center: +42° 21' 7"

Pixel scale: 1.373 arcsec/pixel

Orientation: 90.169 degrees

Field radius: 1.064 degrees


Resolution: 4446x3376

Locations: Home observatory, Atlanta, Georgia, United States

Data source: Backyard

Description

At 30 million light years away, this galaxy is a reach for my 541mm focal length (714mm with a 0.8x FFFR), but I really like this field of view with all the tiny galaxies all over the image, but especially in the upper left quadrant.

I captured a short amount of data in November 2020 with my mono camera using RGB filters in 2020 and decided to process it so I can come back later to see my improvements.

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ngc 891 and surrounding galaxies, 



    
        

            John Mart