Hemisphere:  Southern  ·  Constellation: Chamaeleon (Cha)
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CED 111 Chameleon I Cloud Complex, 



    
        

            Alex Woronow
CED 111 Chameleon I Cloud Complex, 



    
        

            Alex Woronow

CED 111 Chameleon I Cloud Complex

Getting plate-solving status, please wait...
CED 111 Chameleon I Cloud Complex, 



    
        

            Alex Woronow
CED 111 Chameleon I Cloud Complex, 



    
        

            Alex Woronow

CED 111 Chameleon I Cloud Complex

Technical card


Astrometry.net job: 3563344

RA center: 11h 5' 32"

DEC center: -77° 34' 59"

Pixel scale: 1.422 arcsec/pixel

Orientation: 5.640 degrees

Field radius: 0.675 degrees


Resolution: 2420x2420

Data source: Amateur hosting facility

Remote source: DeepSkyWest

Description

CED 111 Chameleon I Cloud Complex

OTA: TAO 150 (f/7.3)

Camera: FLI - ML16200 (1.13 arcseconds/pixel)

Observatory: Deep Sky West, Chile

EXPOSURES:

Red: 16 x 600 sec.

Blue: 17 x 600

Green: 17 x 600

L: 20 x 600

Total exposure ~11.3 hours

Image Width: ~1 deg

Processed by Alex Woronow (2020) using PixInsight, Skylum, Topaz, SWT

CED 111, Chameleon I Cloud, lies at -77 deg declination, a distance of only 500 ly, and far enough above the galactic plane such that foreground stars are scarce. This positions it well for identifying and characterizing faint young stars-and young stars abound. The overlay locates abundant YSOs (Young Stellar Objects), HH (Herbig-Haro Objects), TTau (T-Tauri ) pre-main sequence stars, IR stars, and proto-stars. Infrared observations detect most of the latter three objects, which range from accreting and compressionally heated gas/dust balls still embedded in their parent cloud to very recently ignited stars. At the tip of the red-orange streak at about (11h 9m , -77d 44m) are two T-Tauri stars, and a reasonable interpretation is that the streak itself is a flare of heated gases driven by the recent ignition.

Unlike many other star nurseries (e.g., M 78, IC 2944, NGC 1769, NGC 6334,....), which boast giant O and B stars in their stellar nurseries, CED 111’s new stars, predominantly, are low mass . Not unreasonably, different star-formational processes could account for this difference. The new stars forming in CED 111 largely arise from gravitation, cold accretion from a relatively low-density cloud, as opposed to the violence-driven accretion in the OB nurseries where shock-waves from mechanisms like cloud-cloud collisions, and the ignition of the giant stars themselves, create high-density knots in the nebula that perpetuate star-burst activity.

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