Contains:  Solar system body or event
Jansen and Fabricius, 



    
        

             Astroavani - Avani Soares

Jansen and Fabricius

Jansen and Fabricius, 



    
        

             Astroavani - Avani Soares

Jansen and Fabricius

Equipment

Acquisition details

Resolution: 1248x936

File size: 1.0 MB

Locations: Observatório Parsec, Canoas, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

Data source: Backyard

Description

Janssen is located 140 km southwest of the Rheita Valley. Janssen's diameter is robust 190 km (Copernicus, the “Queen” of all craters, has a “mere” 95 km in diameter!). Janssen is a classic example of how new craters overlap the body of older craters and, at the same time, are smaller than the older craters that support them.

Although Janssen is very old and its walls are in ruins, you should watch it carefully when the sun is low, it is like visiting the ruins of an old castle; it is still full of artifacts and reminders of a bygone era. The remains of the walls are still visible and there are mountains, rilles and well-defined craters inside. The biggest intruder is the Fabricius crater (78 km), which occupies the northern portion of the floor. Fabricius has a slightly distorted shape, a linear group of central peaks rising almost 1 km in height and, also, a second mountain range north of the central peaks that is perfectly visible in this photo.

The most impressive channel, Rima Janssen, is visible through small telescopes. It appears to be a graben that curves visibly from Janssen's southwest wall and connects to Fabricius's south wall. It is unusual because it is a mountainous channel. Janssen and Fabricius are a rewarding field to watch, visit them often.

Comments

Histogram

Jansen and Fabricius, 



    
        

             Astroavani - Avani Soares