Hemisphere:  Northern  ·  Constellation: Vulpecula (Vul)  ·  Contains:  Dumbbell Nebula  ·  Dumbbell nebula  ·  M 27  ·  M27  ·  NGC 6853  ·  PK060-03.1
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Dumbbell Nebula, m27 - eVscope 20m, Bortle 4, 



    
        

            psychwolf
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Dumbbell Nebula, m27 - eVscope 20m, Bortle 4

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Dumbbell Nebula, m27 - eVscope 20m, Bortle 4, 



    
        

            psychwolf
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Dumbbell Nebula, m27 - eVscope 20m, Bortle 4

Technical card

Imaging telescopes or lenses: Unistellar eVscope 114mm f/4.5 Reflector w/ integrated Sony IMX224 sensor

Imaging cameras: Sony IMX224

Mounts: Unistellar eVscope

Guiding telescopes or lenses: Unistellar eVscope

Guiding cameras: Sony IMX224

Software: Annie's Astro Actions  ·  Adobe Inc photoshop CS6  ·  Unistellar eVscope Software

Filters: Omega Optical VHT - Very High Throughput Nebula


Dates:May 13, 2021

Frames:Omega Optical VHT - Very High Throughput Nebula: 300x4" (20') 6C

Integration: 20'

Darks: ~1

Avg. Moon age: 1.52 days

Avg. Moon phase: 2.60%

Bortle Dark-Sky Scale: 4.00

Mean SQM: 20.76

Temperature: 5.50


Astrometry.net job: 4497442

RA center: 19h 59' 40"

DEC center: +22° 45' 6"

Pixel scale: 1.029 arcsec/pixel

Orientation: -51.016 degrees

Field radius: 0.382 degrees


Resolution: 2134x1600

Locations: Greater Milwaukee Area, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, United States

Data source: Traveller

Description

Took advantage of a clear moonless night to travel up to a Bortle 4/5 zone and enjoy some sky surfing with the Unistellar eVscope just north of the Milwaukee city lights. For M27, I've attached a VHT 1.25" Omega filter designed for nebulosity in front of the camera sensor. The VHT is designed to allow more light through, especially when observing with a smaller reflector like this. I liked the output under no moon, and it helped with the Owl Nebula as well, which I'm going to do a little added post-processing later.

Aside from some light processing to upscale, denoise a bit, there's not a ton of further work done on this, so the view here is fairly similar to what I was seeing from my tablet as I watched the photons average out and intensify live in the field. Overall, it's pretty fun for only 20 minutes of accumulation, and just 1 dark file taken. This means less time processing and more time enjoying objects under the skies. Setup was under 10 minutes down and up, which was nice when I left at 1:30am.

The software in the eVscope stacks exposures of a few seconds, over the total time you leave it on. For anyone not familiar, I'd consider the eVscope to be a cross between EAA astronomy and astrophotography.

More info from a paper published online - " the eVscope is equipped with a sensor located at the prime focus of the telescope. The sensor is a CMOS low-light detector IMX224 (1/3-type, 1.27megapixels, 12-bit, up to 60 fps) produced by Sony and characterized by a gain amplifier of up to 72 dB and a low-read noise of less than 1 e- which allows recording of multiple frames with an exposure time between 1ms and 4s. An on-board computer stacks and processes those frames (dark and background removal, shiftadding and stacking) to produce an improved image." As an EAA element, the scope also projects this view to an "eyepiece" OLED display inside the scope, plus via wireless networking.

Comments

Revisions

  • Dumbbell Nebula, m27 - eVscope 20m, Bortle 4, 



    
        

            psychwolf
    Original
  • Final
    Dumbbell Nebula, m27 - eVscope 20m, Bortle 4, 



    
        

            psychwolf
    C

C

Description: Cleared up background, reduced noise, along with a slight curve decrease in the red channel, then flattened the final to get a little closer to what you'd expect to see. This added another 10 minutes to post-processing, but keeping it light still.

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Sky plot

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Dumbbell Nebula, m27 - eVscope 20m, Bortle 4, 



    
        

            psychwolf