Hemisphere:  Northern  ·  Constellation: Monoceros (Mon)  ·  Contains:  NGC 2237  ·  NGC 2238  ·  NGC 2239  ·  NGC 2246  ·  Rosette A  ·  Rosette B  ·  Rosette Nebula  ·  The star 12Mon
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FIRST LIGHT WITH ZWO ASI6200MM - NGC 2244 and Surrounding Nebulae in the Central Rosette Nebula, 



    
        

            William Gottemoller
FIRST LIGHT WITH ZWO ASI6200MM - NGC 2244 and Surrounding Nebulae in the Central Rosette Nebula
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FIRST LIGHT WITH ZWO ASI6200MM - NGC 2244 and Surrounding Nebulae in the Central Rosette Nebula

Getting plate-solving status, please wait...
FIRST LIGHT WITH ZWO ASI6200MM - NGC 2244 and Surrounding Nebulae in the Central Rosette Nebula, 



    
        

            William Gottemoller
FIRST LIGHT WITH ZWO ASI6200MM - NGC 2244 and Surrounding Nebulae in the Central Rosette Nebula
Powered byPixInsight

FIRST LIGHT WITH ZWO ASI6200MM - NGC 2244 and Surrounding Nebulae in the Central Rosette Nebula

Equipment

Imaging Telescopes Or Lenses
Celestron 14'' EdgeHD Schmidt-Cassegrain-Telescope
Imaging Cameras
ZWO ASI6200MM Pro
Mounts
Astro-Physics 1600GTO
Filters
Chroma Ha 50mm 3nm
Accessories
ZWO Off-Axis Guider · ZWO Electronic Filter Wheel · Celestron .7x Focal Reducer for C14 EdgeHD
Software
PHD2 Guiding · DeepSkyStacker x64 · Bisque The SkyX Pro · Photoshop 2020 · Sequence Generator Pro
Guiding Telescopes Or Lenses
Celestron 14'' EdgeHD Schmidt-Cassegrain-Telescope
Guiding Cameras
ZWO ASI183MM

Acquisition details

Dates:
Nov. 25, 2021
Frames:
Chroma Ha 50mm 3nm: 9x900" (2h 15') (gain: 100.00) -5°C bin 2x2
Integration:
2h 15'
Darks:
13
Avg. Moon age:
20.25 days
Avg. Moon phase:
69.64%
Bortle Dark-Sky Scale:
7.00
Temperature:
-10.00

Basic astrometry details

Astrometry.net job: 5263958

RA center: 06h31m55s.7

DEC center: +04°5902

Pixel scale: 0.558 arcsec/pixel

Orientation: 173.748 degrees

Field radius: 0.416 degrees

Resolution: 4307x3194

Locations: Milwaukee Astronomical Society Observatory, New Berlin, WI, United States

Data source: Traveller

Description

Recently, I have been writing an essay contemplating why we love astronomy.

While I was writing the essay, it seemed to me so counterintuitive that we spend whole nights without sleep, all for meditation or spectacular images. Astronomy night shifts are carcinogenic, yet we continue indefatigably in working such shifts. But why? Why do we risk our health for this hobby?

Answer: There is not a single hobby that is as unusual, as different as is astronomy. No hobby other than astronomy causes people to spend every cent in their bank account for ultra-high-tech cameras with highly-technical software and almost unheard-of attributes (I'd imagine that few of us knew well depth, quantum efficiency, or read noise before we got into astrophotography). It is that astronomy is different, not that it is incredible or beautiful, such that it propels us into this remarkable passion.

The Milwaukee Astronomical Society Observatory recently purchased a new ZWO ASI6200MM for the scope we call "G-scope." The image above was taken on the night after Thanksgiving using a C14 EdgeHD, 3nm Ha Chroma filter, .7x reducer, and, of course, the ZWO ASI6200MM. This picture is the first "final incomplete image" ever taken with this camera (the image is not a final one, but it is the first stacked and edited image to come out of the camera); and, compared to our old SBIG STT-8300M, I am absolutely impressed- 15.5 MP even with 2x2 binning, 15-minute exposures, and perhaps the most incredible monochrome image I have ever seen come from that scope.

@Tamas Kriska and I have been working on the two imaging telescopes at the observatory since we bought the new cameras, and I am sure that we were both most impressed by the images the 6200 took. We have some corner issues, but I found those issues to be minimal and restricted to the very edges of the image, so cropping was not a big issue. We are working on this object and also Melotte 15 in the heart of the Heart Nebula.

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