Hemisphere:  Northern  ·  Constellation: Cygnus (Cyg)

Image of the day 12/08/2020

Getting plate-solving status, please wait...
    WR 134 (V1769 Cyg), 



    
        

            Luca Marinelli
    Powered byPixInsight

    WR 134 (V1769 Cyg)

    Image of the day 12/08/2020

    Getting plate-solving status, please wait...
      WR 134 (V1769 Cyg), 



    
        

            Luca Marinelli
      Powered byPixInsight

      WR 134 (V1769 Cyg)

      Imaging telescopes or lenses: Teleskop Service ONTC 10" f4 Newton

      Imaging cameras: ZWO ASI1600MM Pro

      Mounts: Astro-Physics 1100GTO

      Guiding telescopes or lenses: Teleskop Service ONTC 10" f4 Newton

      Guiding cameras: Starlight Xpress Ultrastar Mono

      Software: Denoise AI  ·  Main Sequence Software Sequence Generator Pro Sequence Generator Pro  ·  Starnet ++  ·  Astro-Physics Command Center (APCC) Pro Software  ·  Photoshop CC  ·  PIXINSIGHT 1.8  ·  PHD2 Guiding PHD2 v2.6.5

      Filters: Astrodon Tru-Balance Gen2 E-Series - R 36mm  ·  Astrodon Narrowband 3nm Ha  ·  Astrodon Tru-Balance Gen2 E-Series - B 36mm  ·  Astrodon Tru-Balance Gen2 E-Series - G 36mm  ·  Astrodon Narrowband 3nm OIII

      Accessory: QHYCCD OAG-M  ·  Tele Vue Paracorr Type 2  ·  Pegasus Astro Ultimate Power Box  ·  QHYCCD QHYCFW3-M


      Dates:June 7, 2020June 9, 2020June 12, 2020June 14, 2020Sept. 30, 2020Oct. 30, 2020

      Frames:
      Astrodon Narrowband 3nm Ha: 125x360" (12h 30') (gain: 139.00) -15C bin 1x1
      Astrodon Narrowband 3nm OIII: 149x360" (14h 54') (gain: 139.00) -15C bin 1x1
      Astrodon Tru-Balance Gen2 E-Series - B 36mm: 30x120" (1h) (gain: 50.00) -15C bin 1x1
      Astrodon Tru-Balance Gen2 E-Series - G 36mm: 30x120" (1h) (gain: 50.00) -15C bin 1x1
      Astrodon Tru-Balance Gen2 E-Series - R 36mm: 30x120" (1h) (gain: 50.00) -15C bin 1x1

      Integration: 30h 24'

      Darks: 50

      Flats: 20

      Flat darks: 50

      Bias: 100

      Avg. Moon age: 17.87 days

      Avg. Moon phase: 78.87%

      Bortle Dark-Sky Scale: 5.00


      RA center: 20h10m00s.150

      DEC center: +36°1457.13

      Pixel scale: 0.913 arcsec/pixel

      Orientation: 179.575 degrees

      Field radius: 0.531 degrees

      More info:Open 


      Resolution: 3318x2556

      Locations: Home Observatory, Schenectady, New York, United States

      Data source: Backyard

      Description

      The upper portion of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram is populated by luminous stars. Among them are Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars, very hot stars with effective temperatures of 25,000K to 100,000K. WR stars are also losing mass at rates in excess of 10^(-5) solar masses per year, creating strong and fast stellar wind in the process. Unlike their close relative, the luminous blue variable stars, WR stars are less massive, with progenitor stars that can be as low as 20 solar masses.

      The first WR stars were discovered in 1867 by C.J.E. Wolf and G. Rayet while working at the Paris Observatory. While conducting a survey of the stars in Cygnus, they observed three stars in close proximity that exhibit unusually strong and very broad emission lines, rather than the absorption lines seen in other stars. One of the three stars originally identified by Wolf and Rayet was WR134 (also known by its variable star identifier as V1769 Cyg).

      Wolf-Rayet stars are further classified depending on the composition as measured through the broad emission lines. Three classes of WR stars are recognized today: WN, WC, and WO, depending on the dominant elements displayed in the emission line (nitrogen and helium, carbon and helium, oxygen). In a scheme suggested in 1976 by Peter Conti, WR stars are part of an evolutionary scheme for massive stars that always ends in a supernova. As inner parts of the star core are exposed through mass ejection, the end of this evolution for stars of at least 20 solar masses goes through: WN -> WC -> SN.

      WR134 is a variable Wolf-Rayet star of type WN located roughly 6,000 light years from us. Its surface temperature approaches 63,000K and it is 400,000 times as luminous of the Sun. In the image, WR134 is the bright white star in the center of the oxygen bubble. WR134 is surrounded by a faint expanding shell of oxygen ionized gas, powered by the intense radiation and stellar wind from the star. WR134 and WR135 are immersed in a large ionized H I shell. S.Gervais and N. St-Louis suggested that this hydrogen shell was mainly blown during the main-sequence progenitor O-star phase.

      References:

      - B. Carroll, D.A. Ostlie, An Introduction to Modern Astrophysics (2017)

      - S.Gervais and N. St-Louis, "A LARGE H I SHELL SURROUNDING THE WOLF-RAYET STAR HD 191765", THE ASTRONOMICAL JOURNAL, 118:2394-2408, 1999

      - Wikipedia, WR134 entry

      Comments

      Revisions

      • Final
        WR 134 (V1769 Cyg), 



    
        

            Luca Marinelli
        Original
        WR 134 (V1769 Cyg), 



    
        

            Luca Marinelli
        E

      E

      Description: ZWO Astronomy Picture of the Week #52 (2020)

      Uploaded: ...

      Sky plot

      Sky plot

      Histogram

      WR 134 (V1769 Cyg), 



    
        

            Luca Marinelli