Contains:  Solar system body or event
Jupiter captured using a self-made equatorial platform and PUSHING the Dobson, 



    
        

            Nils Langner

Jupiter captured using a self-made equatorial platform and PUSHING the Dobson

Acquisition type: Lucky imaging
Jupiter captured using a self-made equatorial platform and PUSHING the Dobson, 



    
        

            Nils Langner

Jupiter captured using a self-made equatorial platform and PUSHING the Dobson

Acquisition type: Lucky imaging

Acquisition details

Date: Sept. 1, 2021

Time: 23:20

Frames: 150

Focal length: 3375

Seeing: 4

Resolution: 1280x853

File size: 72.9 KB

Locations: Munich, Bavaria, New York, NY, United States

Data source: Backyard

Description

This is one of my first attempts imaging Jupiter with my 12 inch ExploreScientific Ultralight Dobson an a self-made equatorial platform. In the end, using a Dobson for such a task doesn't prove to be so great, since both collimation and focus (established using a self-made batinov mask on a bright star) easily changes when pushing too often. It is also a hassle even finding the planet by pushing, especially when using a 2,25 Barlow lens. Once the planet is in view, guiding is good enough in order to capture about 600 to 1000 frames per video until I need to push the telescope to get the target back into the field of view. I am finally combining several videos aiming towards 5000 to 10.000 frames and stacking the best ones in AutoStakkert. Anyway, I am happy having achieved somehow, taken into account that a Dobson is not really meant for photography.  - My first try in Corsica during the summer holiday was not too successful due to catastrophic seeing, probably caused by hot nearby roofs causing heat radiation even during the night. Back home in moderate Bavarian climate conditions I got better results such as this one.

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Jupiter captured using a self-made equatorial platform and PUSHING the Dobson, 



    
        

            Nils Langner

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Solar System Imaging