Hemisphere:  Northern  ·  Constellation: Ursa Major (UMa)  ·  Contains:  Bode's nebulae  ·  M 81  ·  M 82  ·  NGC 3031  ·  NGC 3034  ·  NGC 3077
Bodes Galaxy region, 



    
        

            Bruce
Bodes Galaxy region
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Bodes Galaxy region, 



    
        

            Bruce
Bodes Galaxy region
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Technical card

Imaging telescopes or lenses: William Optics Star 71

Imaging cameras: Atik 460 EX

Mounts: Astro-Physics Mach1AP GTO with GTOCP3

Guiding telescopes or lenses: Orion Mini 50mm Guide Scope

Software: PHD guiding  ·  SequenceGeneratorPro  ·  photoshop  ·  CCDStack 2+

Filters: Ha 3nm  ·  Astrodon Tru-Balance Generation 2 LRGB

Accessory: Atik EFW2


Dates:Nov. 25, 2014

Frames: 56x360" (5h 36')

Integration: 5h 36'

Avg. Moon age: 3.14 days

Avg. Moon phase: 10.76%


Basic astrometry details

Astrometry.net job: 495928

RA center: 9h 57' 39"

DEC center: +69° 10' 33"

Orientation: 0.201 degrees

Field radius: 1.255 degrees


Resolution: 1800x1430

Locations: Meadowlark Ridge Observatory, New Glarus, Wisconsin, United States

Description

M81, M82 & NGC 3077 are part of the “M81 Group” in the constellations of Ursa Major and Camelopardalis. These three galaxies interact strongly with each other and this has caused hydrogen to be stripped away from each resulting in the formation of filamentary gas structures within the group.

M81, or Bode’s Galaxy, is a large spiral galaxy with an active galactic nucleus which harbors a supermassive black hole. It is located about 12 MLY (million light years) from earth. It is located near the center of the image.

M82 is a bright edge on spiral galaxy which can be seen with binoculars in certain locations. It is also known as the Cigar Galaxy (due to its shape) or Starburst Galaxy (due to the large active starburst region in its core). In early 2014 a new supernova was discovered in M82. M82 lies near the bottom of this image.

To the upper right you will notice a small red “fuzzy” area. This is galaxy NGC 3077 which has been determined to be a hotbed of star formation. It was discovered by Sir William Herschel in 1801. It lies approximately 13 MLY from earth.

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Sky plot

Sky plot

Histogram

Bodes Galaxy region, 



    
        

            Bruce