Celestial hemisphere:  Northern  ·  Constellation: Pegasus (Peg)
Getting plate-solving status, please wait...
Einstein Cross, 



    
        

            KuriousGeorge
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Einstein Cross

Getting plate-solving status, please wait...
Einstein Cross, 



    
        

            KuriousGeorge
Powered byPixInsight

Einstein Cross

Acquisition details

Dates:
Sept. 8, 2018 ·  Sept. 11, 2018 ·  Sept. 13, 2018
Frames:
Astrodon 50 mm G: 8×900(2h) -20°C bin 1×1
Astrodon 50mm B: 6×900(1h 30′) -20°C bin 1×1
Astrodon 50mm L: 16×300(1h 20′) -20°C bin 1×1
Astrodon 50mm R: 7×900(1h 45′) -20°C bin 1×1
Integration:
6h 35′
Darks:
20
Flats:
80
Flat darks:
80
Bias:
20
Avg. Moon age:
11.38 days
Avg. Moon phase:
8.02%
Mean SQM:
21.50
Mean FWHM:
2.00

RA center: 22h40m30s.154

DEC center: +03°2125.49

Pixel scale: 0.468 arcsec/pixel

Orientation: -179.247 degrees

Field radius: 0.371 degrees

More info:Open 

Resolution: 4016x4052

File size: 3.0 MB

Locations: KG Observatory, Julian, CA, United States

Data source: Backyard

Description

2nd of 3 September objects.

Shown here is my attempt to image the very difficult Einstein Cross. The cross itself is a Quasar, 8 Billion light year's distant, having its light bent into 4 points by the foreground galaxy's gravity (400 million light year's distance). This is visual proof of Einstein's theory about gravity being able to bend light. What you see here has also been simulated mathematically and it expected.

Unfortunately the cross is only 1.6" in diameter. With the CDK24, I have a 2 micron spot size (assuming perfect seeing) on 9 micron pixels with 0.47" per pixel. With an 0.2" RMS max tracking error, I should be able to see the cross. But my best 16 300-sec luminance subs were around 2" seeing. Thus the "cross" stars overlap as you see here.

I'd need less than 1" seeing to clearly see the cross. But that is very rare with my exposure times and 4,200' altitude. I think I'd need to resort to planetary techniques to see this. That is, a CMOS video camera with magnification and <1 second subs. The best subs with a very short exposure should be less than 1" seeing (i.e., Lucky Imaging). I assume I'd need hundreds or thousands of exposures to do it. Looking forward to doing this in the future when the new hi-res CMOS cameras are available.

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Einstein Cross, 



    
        

            KuriousGeorge

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Unique or Unusal Deep Sky Targets