Hemisphere:  Northern  ·  Constellation: Aquila (Aql)  ·  Contains:  NGC 6755  ·  NGC 6756
Getting plate-solving status, please wait...
NGC 6755 and 6756, 



    
        

            Gary Imm
NGC 6755 and 6756
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NGC 6755 and 6756

Getting plate-solving status, please wait...
NGC 6755 and 6756, 



    
        

            Gary Imm
NGC 6755 and 6756
Powered byPixInsight

NGC 6755 and 6756

Imaging telescopes or lenses: Takahashi FSQ-85ED

Imaging cameras: ZWO ASI 1600MM Cooled Pro

Mounts: Astro-Physics Mach1GTO

Guiding telescopes or lenses: Orion 60mm Guidescope

Guiding cameras: Orion StarShoot AutoGuider Pro Mono

Software: Main Sequence Software Sequence Generator Pro  ·  PixInsight  ·  Stark Labs PHD2 2.6.3

Filters: Astrodon Green 31mm Gen2 I-Series  ·  Astrodon Blue 31mm Gen2 I-Series  ·  Astrodon Red 31mm Gen2 I-Series

Accessory: ZWO EFW  ·  Takahashi Flattener TOA-67  ·  Feathertouch Focuser Boss II Electronic Focusing Control


Dates:Aug. 6, 2019

Frames:
Astrodon Blue 31mm Gen2 I-Series: 60x60" (1h) (gain: 139.00) -14C bin 1x1
Astrodon Green 31mm Gen2 I-Series: 60x60" (1h) (gain: 139.00) -15C bin 1x1
Astrodon Red 31mm Gen2 I-Series: 60x60" (1h) (gain: 139.00) -15C bin 1x1

Integration: 3h

Avg. Moon age: 6.09 days

Avg. Moon phase: 36.42%


Astrometry.net job: 2859475

RA center: 19h 7' 57"

DEC center: +4° 30' 54"

Pixel scale: 1.738 arcsec/pixel

Orientation: 241.811 degrees

Field radius: 1.384 degrees


Resolution: 4581x3445

Locations: Backyard (Mag 20.8 - Bortle 4.5), Onalaska, Texas, United States

Data source: Backyard

Description

This image captures a pair of open clusters located 5000 light years away in the constellation of Aquila. The clusters lie in the dust clouds of the Great Rift of our galaxy. These clouds greatly dim the brightness of these clusters by at least 3 magnitudes. Also visible are some interesting dark dust lanes that flow through the image. I was tempted to crop the image to highlight the clusters, but in the end I felt that the surrounding sky was too interesting to cut out.

The full resolution view is necessary to see the clusters in detail. NGC 6755 is to the left and NGC 6756 is to the right. Some believe that this pair may be the 2nd binary open star cluster identified in the Milky Way (the first being NGC 869 and 884, the Double Cluster). A binary open cluster is two open clusters which were birthed from the same molecular cloud. But recent studies of the separation and age of these 2 clusters have determined that they likely had different origins.

NGC 6755 has 150 stars and is about 25 light years in diameter, while NGC 6756 has 40 stars and is only 5 light years in diameter. Both clusters are silhouetted against starry backgrounds but there is enough difference in magnitude with the background that the clusters are fairly easily identified. The smaller cluster is easier to spot because it is more dense.

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