M33-EC1 and M33-EC2 globular clusters, 



    
        

            Giuseppe Donatiello

M33-EC1 and M33-EC2 globular clusters

Acquisition type: Electronically-Assisted Astronomy (EAA, e.g. based on a live video feed)
M33-EC1 and M33-EC2 globular clusters, 



    
        

            Giuseppe Donatiello

M33-EC1 and M33-EC2 globular clusters

Acquisition type: Electronically-Assisted Astronomy (EAA, e.g. based on a live video feed)

Technical card

Basic astrometry details

Astrometry.net job: 4018284


Resolution: 1698x854

Data source: Professional, scientific grade data

Description

In the census of satellite galaxies, a dozen massive globular clusters should be included which, most likely, represent the nucleus of dwarf galaxies stripped of peripheral stars, after repeated passages around their parent galaxies.

The largest of these globular super-clusters is Andromeda's M31-G1 (or Mayal II), followed by Omega Centauri belonging to our Milky Way. Less well known are two notable globulars belonging to M33, the third major galaxy in the Local Group.

M33-EC1, discovered in 2008 [R. Stonkute et al. 2008], is 890 kpc from the Milky Way and is separated by 12.5 kpc from M33. It has an average age of about 7 billion years and low metallicity.

M33-EC2, discovered in 2009 [Huxor et al. 2009], is distant 870 kpc from the Milky Way and is separated 37.7 kpc from M33, and has similar characteristics to the previous one.

These two globulars, together with the spheroidal dwarf galaxy Andromeda XXII, form a system of possible satellites of M33 which, in turn, is the major satellite of M31, the Andromeda Galaxy.

The images are obtained with DECaLS raw data. The boxes are 150 arcsec per side.

Comments

Histogram

M33-EC1 and M33-EC2 globular clusters, 



    
        

            Giuseppe Donatiello