Hemisphere:  Northern  ·  Constellation: Cepheus (Cep)  ·  Contains:  Bow-Tie nebula  ·  NGC 40  ·  PK120+09.1
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NGC 40 BowTie, 



    
        

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NGC 40 BowTie

Imaging telescopes or lenses: Stellarvue SVT 130T

Imaging cameras: SBIG STT 8300M

Mounts: Astro-Physics Mach1AP GTO CP4

Guiding telescopes or lenses: Stellarvue SVT 130T

Guiding cameras: SBIG STT 8300M

Software: PixInsight  ·  Software Bisque TheSky X Professional  ·  photoshop  ·  Starnet ++  ·  CCDWare FocusMax V.4  ·  Straton Destar 2.0  ·  Topaz Denoise AI  ·  3D LUT Creator  ·  Maxim DL  ·  EQMOD  ·  DC-3 Dreams ACP Observatory Control Software  ·  Astro-Physics Command Center (APCC) Software  ·  Annie's Astro Actions Version 7.0

Filters: Astrodon Red Tru-Balance E-Series Generation 2  ·  Astrodon Blue Tru-Balance E-Series Gen 2  ·  Astrodon Green Tru-Balance E-Series Gen 2

Accessory: Moonlite Nitecrawler 3.5  ·  Tolga Astro Alnitak Flat-Man Electroluminescent Flat Fielding Device


Dates:Dec. 15, 2020

Frames:
Astrodon Blue Tru-Balance E-Series Gen 2: 15x240" (1h)
Astrodon Green Tru-Balance E-Series Gen 2: 15x240" (1h)
Astrodon Red Tru-Balance E-Series Generation 2: 15x240" (1h)

Integration: 3h

Avg. Moon age: 0.92 days

Avg. Moon phase: 0.95%


RA center: 00h13m01s.108

DEC center: +72°3116.27

Pixel scale: 1.221 arcsec/pixel

Orientation: -5.243 degrees

Field radius: 0.120 degrees

WCS transformation: thin plate spline

More info:Open 


Resolution: 500x500

Locations: Stanford Faculty Observatory (Bortle 6 SQM 18.6), Stanford, California, United States

Data source: Own remote observatory

Remote source: Non-commercial independent facility

Description

NGC 40 (also known as the Bow-Tie Nebula and Caldwell 2) is a planetary nebula discovered by William Herschel on November 25, 1788, and is composed of hot gas around a dying star. The star has ejected its outer layer which has left behind a smaller, hot star with a temperature on the surface of about 50,000 degrees Celsius. Radiation from the star causes the shed outer layer to heat to about 10,000 degrees Celsius, and is about one light-year across.[3] About 30,000 years from now, scientists theorize that NGC 40 will fade away, leaving only a white dwarf star approximately the size of Earth..... Wikipedia

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