Celestial hemisphere:  Northern  ·  Constellation: Ursa Major (UMa)  ·  Contains:  NGC 2681  ·  PGC 2391701  ·  PGC 24936
Getting plate-solving status, please wait...
NGC 2681, 



    
        

            Gary Imm
NGC 2681, 



    
        

            Gary Imm

NGC 2681

Getting plate-solving status, please wait...
NGC 2681, 



    
        

            Gary Imm
NGC 2681, 



    
        

            Gary Imm

NGC 2681

Acquisition details

Dates:
Dec. 16, 2020 ·  Dec. 17, 2020
Frames:
Astrodon Gen2 I-Series Tru-Balance Blue: 30×120(1h) (gain: 139.00) -20°C bin 1×1
Astrodon Gen2 I-Series Tru-Balance Green: 30×120(1h) (gain: 139.00) -20°C bin 1×1
Astrodon Gen2 I-Series Tru-Balance Lum: 60×120(2h) (gain: 139.00) -20°C bin 1×1
Astrodon Gen2 I-Series Tru-Balance Red: 30×120(1h) (gain: 139.00) -20°C bin 1×1
Integration:
5h
Avg. Moon age:
2.53 days
Avg. Moon phase:
7.36%

RA center: 08h53m32s.868

DEC center: +51°1849.71

Pixel scale: 0.281 arcsec/pixel

Orientation: -3.103 degrees

Field radius: 0.165 degrees

More info:Open 

Resolution: 3282x2656

File size: 3.0 MB

Locations: Backyard (Mag 20.8 - Bortle 4.5), Onalaska, Texas, United States

Data source: Backyard

Description

This object is a face-on lenticular galaxy located 54 million light years away in the constellation of Ursa Major at a declination of +51 degrees. This magnitude 11 galaxy is the 171st brightest galaxy in the sky. It spans 3 arc-minutes in our apparent view and has a diameter of 50,000 light years.

The color of this galaxy disk is unusual. I calibrated the colors twice in Pixinsight in an attempt to represent the color as realistically as possible. It is unusual in that the inner region is a reddish color, while the mid-region has an aqua blue tint. The color transitions to blue for the outer disk.

The structure of the disk is also interesting. As described in the 1999 paper “Triple Bars and Complex Central Structures in Disk Galaxies”, by Erwin and Sparke, this galaxy has a triple set of bars as identified by detailed analyses of the Hubble image. The 3 bars are harder to see in my image. The largest, and easiest to see, bar extends across most of the disk, from 11 o’clock down to 5 o’clock. The intermediate bar, across the mid-disk region, is probably hardest to see, extending across from 10 o’clock to 4 o’clock. The third small oval bar is in the bright inner core region, extending vertically across the whitish core.

I actually see a fourth bar – slightly smaller than the largest bar and perpendicular to it. But perhaps I have just been staring at this one too long.

There is a potential companion in the upper right corner of the image, galaxy MCG+09-15-039, which is a similar distance away.

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