Getting plate-solving status, please wait...
Vega Spectrogram, 



    
        

            Joel Shepherd
Vega Spectrogram, 



    
        

            Joel Shepherd

Vega Spectrogram

Getting plate-solving status, please wait...
Vega Spectrogram, 



    
        

            Joel Shepherd
Vega Spectrogram, 



    
        

            Joel Shepherd

Vega Spectrogram

Imaging Telescopes Or Lenses
TEC 140 APO FL
Imaging Cameras
Atik 460EX Mono
Mounts
Astro-Physics Mach1GTO
Filters
PatonHawksleyEducationLtdStarAnalyser200
Accessories
QHYCCD OFF AXIS GUIDER · TEC FRC (.9 reducer + FF)
Software
Field Tested Systems RSpec · Sequence Generator Pro
Guiding Cameras
Lodestar X2

Acquisition details

Dates:
June 16, 2020
Frames:
Integration:
1"
Avg. Moon age:
25.03 days
Avg. Moon phase:
21.19%
Bortle Dark-Sky Scale:
6.00
Temperature:
14.00

Basic astrometry details

Astrometry.net job: 3619330

Resolution: 1342x714

Locations: Home, Seattle, WA, United States

Data source: Backyard

Description

I've started tinkering with spectrography: this is the first decent spectrogram I've been able to capture. Vega is a type A0v star which (I am told!) is a good starting point thanks to its very strong Balmer lines which delineate wavelengths of hydrogen absorption. The pretty rainbow and curve is the spectrograph that I captured. The blue lines are a reference spectrum for A0v-type stars. The noticeable dips in both spectras indicate (primarily) hydrogen absorption: H-alpha, H-beta and so on. One reason the shapes of the two curves are so different is that I haven't calibrated mine for instrument response (sensitivity at different wavelengths). That'll come later: the absorption lines are easy to pick out nonetheless.

It's definitely a bit of a different sport from "ordinary" astrophotography: focusing is much more manual, exposure times are much shorter, you can stack exposures though I didn't here, Processing (in RSpec, here) is fairly quick. The analysis afterwards is the interesting part.

Actual exposure time was 0.225 seconds: for such a bright star, the exposure needs to be quite short so as not to saturate any part of the spectrum.

Comments

Histogram

Vega Spectrogram, 



    
        

            Joel Shepherd

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Spectroscopy