Hemisphere:  Northern  ·  Constellation: Pegasus (Peg)  ·  Contains:  NGC 7217
Getting plate-solving status, please wait...
Herschel H207-2, 



    
        

            Samuel
Herschel H207-2
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Herschel H207-2

Getting plate-solving status, please wait...
Herschel H207-2, 



    
        

            Samuel
Herschel H207-2
Powered byPixInsight

Herschel H207-2

Technical card

Imaging telescopes or lenses: GSO RC12

Imaging cameras: Atik 4000

Guiding telescopes or lenses: GSO RC12

Guiding cameras: Lodestar

Focal reducers: AP CCDT67

Software: PixInsight

Filters: Baader Planetarium B 36mm  ·  Baader Planetarium G 36mm  ·  Baader Planetarium R 36mm  ·  Baader Planetarium L 36mm


Dates:Aug. 19, 2014Aug. 21, 2014

Frames:
Baader Planetarium B 36mm: 14x450" (1h 45') bin 2x2
Baader Planetarium G 36mm: 16x450" (2h) bin 2x2
Baader Planetarium L 36mm: 47x900" (11h 45') bin 1x1
Baader Planetarium R 36mm: 16x450" (2h) bin 2x2

Integration: 17h 30'

Avg. Moon age: 24.94 days

Avg. Moon phase: 22.51%


Basic astrometry details

Astrometry.net job: 348992

RA center: 22h07m52s.3

DEC center: +31°2128

Pixel scale: 0.956 arcsec/pixel

Orientation: -3.376 degrees

Field radius: 0.338 degrees


Resolution: 1800x1800

Locations: Observatorio remoto Tomas Lopez en AstroCamp, Nerpio, Albacete, Spain

Data source: Own remote observatory

Remote source: AstroCamp

Description

NGC 7217 is an unbarred spiral galaxy in the constellation Pegasus.

NGC 7217 is a gas-poor system whose main features are the presence of several rings of stars concentric to its nucleus: three main ones -being the outermost one the most prominent and the one that features most of the gas and star formation of this galaxy-, plus several others inside the innermost one discovered with the help of the Hubble Space Telescope, a feature that suggests NGC 7217's central regions have suffered several starbursts, and a very large and massive spheroid that extends beyond its disk.

Other noteworthy features this galaxy has are the presence of a number of stars rotating in the opposite direction around the galaxy's center to most of them and two distinct stellar populations: one of intermediate age on its innermost regions and a younger, metal-poor on its outermost ones.

It has been suggested these features were caused by a merger with another galaxy and, in fact, computer simulations show that NGC 7217 could have been a large lenticular galaxy that merged with one or two smaller gas-rich ones of late Hubble type becoming the spiral galaxy we see today.; however right now this galaxy is isolated in space, with no nearby major companions.

Collaboration between me, Salvatore Iovene and Jaime Alemany.

Comments

Sky plot

Sky plot

Histogram

Herschel H207-2, 



    
        

            Samuel