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Contains:  M 9, NGC 6333
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Messier 9 or M9 atop a dark cloud of dust designated Barnard 64, 





    
        

            Stephen Harris
Messier 9 or M9 atop a dark cloud of dust designated Barnard 64

Messier 9 or M9 atop a dark cloud of dust designated Barnard 64

Technical card

Resolution: 4338x2958

Dates:Sept. 29, 2016

Frames: 72x30"

Integration: 0.6 hours

Avg. Moon age: 28.14 days

Avg. Moon phase: 2.17%

Astrometry.net job: 1262140

RA center: 259.682 degrees

DEC center: -18.417 degrees

Pixel scale: 1.939 arcsec/pixel

Orientation: -71.617 degrees

Field radius: 1.414 degrees

Locations: HAS Dark Site , Columbus, Texas, United States

Description

Messier 9 or M9 (also designated NGC 6333) is a globular cluster in the constellation of Ophiuchus. It is positioned in the southern part of the constellation to the southwest of Eta Ophiuchi, and lies atop a dark cloud of dust designated Barnard 64. The cluster was discovered by French astronomer Charles Messier on June 3, 1764, who described it as a "nebula without stars". In 1783, English astronomer William Herschel was able to use his reflector to resolve individual stars within the cluster. He found the cluster to be 7−8′ in diameter with stars densely packed near the center.[

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astrosmh
Stephen Harris
License: None (All rights reserved)
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Messier 9 or M9 atop a dark cloud of dust designated Barnard 64, 





    
        

            Stephen Harris