Celestial hemisphere:  Southern  ·  Constellation: Cetus (Cet)
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Abell 370 Galaxy Cluster and The Dragon – 5 billion light years, 



    
        

            KuriousGeorge
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Abell 370 Galaxy Cluster and The Dragon – 5 billion light years

Getting plate-solving status, please wait...
Abell 370 Galaxy Cluster and The Dragon – 5 billion light years, 



    
        

            KuriousGeorge
Powered byPixInsight

Abell 370 Galaxy Cluster and The Dragon – 5 billion light years

Acquisition details

Dates:
Nov. 17, 2020 ·  Nov. 18, 2020 ·  Nov. 19, 2020
Frames:
Astrodon 50 mm G: 8×900(2h) (gain: 0.00) -10°C bin 1×1
Astrodon 50mm B: 8×900(2h) (gain: 0.00) -10°C bin 1×1
Astrodon 50mm L: 24×900(6h) (gain: 0.00) -10°C bin 1×1
Astrodon 50mm R: 8×900(2h) (gain: 0.00) -10°C bin 1×1
Integration:
12h
Darks:
20
Flats:
80
Flat darks:
80
Bias:
20
Avg. Moon age:
3.67 days
Avg. Moon phase:
15.10%
Mean SQM:
21.30
Mean FWHM:
1.90

RA center: 02h39m50s.774

DEC center: -01°3328.20

Pixel scale: 0.098 arcsec/pixel

Orientation: 0.748 degrees

Field radius: 0.091 degrees

More info:Open 

Resolution: 5356x4060

File size: 1.1 MB

Locations: KG Observatory, Julian, CA, United States

Data source: Backyard

Description

I was curious to see if I could image this famous Hubble field...

Abell 370 with Hubble Visible Light

This was later imaged in more detail to conclude the Frontier Fields program...

The last of the Frontier Fields – Abell 370

FHWM on the 15-min L subs was between 1.6" and 2.2". It's possible I could get a bit deeper and sharper, but probably not like Hubble. (-:

If it weren't for the notiecable red shift, one might mistake this very distant Galaxy Cluster for a much closer Star Cluster.

"Abell 370 is a galaxy cluster located approximately 5 billion light-years away from Earth in the constellation Cetus. Its core is made up of several hundred galaxies. It was catalogued by George Abell, and is the most distant of the clusters he catalogued.

Abell 370 is one of the very first galaxy clusters in which astronomers observed the phenomenon of gravitational lensing, the warping of spacetime by the cluster’s gravitational field that distorts the light from galaxies lying far behind it.

In 2009, study in the field of Abell 370 revealed a grouping of background galaxies lensed and distorted by the cluster into a 30" long arc with the appearance of a dragon, hence nicknamed "The Dragon" by NASA scientists. Its head is composed of a spiral galaxy, with another image of the spiral composing the tail. Several other images form the body of the dragon, all overlapping. These galaxies all lie approximately 5 billion light years away."

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  • Abell 370 Galaxy Cluster and The Dragon – 5 billion light years, 



    
        

            KuriousGeorge
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    Abell 370 Galaxy Cluster and The Dragon – 5 billion light years, 



    
        

            KuriousGeorge
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Abell 370 Galaxy Cluster and The Dragon – 5 billion light years, 



    
        

            KuriousGeorge