Image of the day 10/06/2021

Getting plate-solving status, please wait...
    LMC: The Spiders Web, 



    
        

            Mathew Ludgate

    LMC: The Spiders Web

    Image of the day 10/06/2021

    Getting plate-solving status, please wait...
      LMC: The Spiders Web, 



    
        

            Mathew Ludgate

      LMC: The Spiders Web

      Technical card

      Imaging telescopes or lenses: NIKON 200mm f/2

      Imaging cameras: ASI6200mm Pro

      Mounts: RST-135

      Software: Voyager  ·  Adobe Inc Photoshop CC  ·  PixInsight

      Filters: Chroma 8nm Ha SII OIII


      Dates:Feb. 12, 2021

      Frames:Chroma 8nm Ha SII OIII: 163x300" (13h 35') (gain: 100.00) -10C bin 1x1

      Integration: 13h 35'

      Avg. Moon age: 0.71 days

      Avg. Moon phase: 0.57%


      Basic astrometry details

      Astrometry.net job: 5050015


      Resolution: 4638x6323

      Locations: Backyard, Dunedin, New Zealand

      Data source: Backyard

      Description

      Large Magellanic Cloud: The Spiders Web

      I finished this project earlier this year, and I was very honoured that this image was shortlisted in the galaxy category of the 2021 Astronomy Photographer of the Year competition.  

      Located in the southern constellation Dorado lies the largest satellite galaxy of the Milky Way, the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). The LMC spans about 15,000 lights years in width and lies a mere 160,000 light years away.   Being so close, this allows us to easily resolve the numerous emission nebula, Ha shells and supernova remnants contained within the LMC.  In fact, the LMC is an ideal area to study SNRs as high resolution images are possible and there is less uncertainty in regards to the distance to the SNRs than with Milky Way SNRs.  In addition, Milky Way SNR samples are affected by Malmquist bias, whereby brighter objects are more frequently observed as distance (and volume) increases making these brighter objects seem more numerous than they are. Interestingly, the first extragalactic SNRs ever discovered (N49, N63A, and N132D) are located in the LMC. There are now 62 confirmed SNRs within the LMC, and at least 32 SNR candidates.  

      Revision B https://www.astrobin.com/73l5xa/B/ is an annotated version showing the location of the confirmed SNRs. It is a good challenge to try to find some of these in the main image before checking the annotated version.

      Revision C https://www.astrobin.com/73l5xa/C/ is a very crowded annotated version showing all of the named extended objects within the LMC found in the Catalogue of extended objects in Magellanic Clouds from Bica et al, 2008. In this image emission nebula are yellow, and Ha shells/supershells are annotated in pink.  

      In common with many galaxies, the LMC has a halo surrounding it. Despite the narrowband filters, you can just start to discern some of the variations in this very faint but large halo. This halo has arcs and spiral features, and extends well beyond this frame.  The LMC is classified as a magellanic spiral, and you can also start to discern this spiral nature, wrapping from the top right down to the bottom left of the frame.

      Comments

      Revisions

      • Final
        LMC: The Spiders Web, 



    
        

            Mathew Ludgate
        Original
        LMC: The Spiders Web, 



    
        

            Mathew Ludgate
        B
        LMC: The Spiders Web, 



    
        

            Mathew Ludgate
        C

      B

      Description: An annotated version showing the location of the confirmed LMC SNRs.

      Uploaded: ...

      C

      Description: An annotated version showing all of the named extended objects within the LMC found in the Catalogue of extended objects in Magellanic Clouds from Bica et al, 2008. In this image emission nebula are yellow, and Ha shells/supershells are annotated in pink.

      Uploaded: ...

      Histogram

      LMC: The Spiders Web, 



    
        

            Mathew Ludgate