Hemisphere:  Northern  ·  Constellation: Canes Venatici (CVn)  ·  Contains:  M 106  ·  M106  ·  NGC 4248  ·  NGC 4258  ·  NGC4248
Getting plate-solving status, please wait...
M106, 



    
        

            Timothy Martin & Nic Patridge
Powered byPixInsight

M106

Getting plate-solving status, please wait...
M106, 



    
        

            Timothy Martin & Nic Patridge
Powered byPixInsight

M106

Imaging telescopes or lenses: Celestron Edge 1100 HD

Imaging cameras: ZWO ASI2400MC Pro

Mounts: Celestron CGX-L

Guiding telescopes or lenses: Celestron OAG

Guiding cameras: ZWO ASI174MM

Software: Topaz Labs DenoiseAI  ·  Nighttime Imaging 'N' Astronomy N.I.N.A. 1.10  ·  Aries Productions Astro Pixel Precessor v1.082  ·  Open PHD Guiding PHD2 2.6.9  ·  Pixinsight 1.8  ·  Topaz Labs Topaz Studio II  ·  Adobe Photoshop CC 2020

Filters: Optolong L-Pro 2"

Accessory: Celestron Focus Motor  ·  Pegasus Astro Powerbox Advanced


Dates:Dec. 25, 2020

Frames:Optolong L-Pro 2": 90x120" (3h) (gain: 160.00) -8C bin 1x1

Integration: 3h

Darks: ~30

Flats: ~50

Flat darks: ~50

Avg. Moon age: 10.50 days

Avg. Moon phase: 80.76%

Bortle Dark-Sky Scale: 8.00


Astrometry.net job: 4517251

RA center: 12h 18' 58"

DEC center: +47° 17' 22"

Pixel scale: 0.441 arcsec/pixel

Orientation: 89.549 degrees

Field radius: 0.338 degrees


Resolution: 3202x4483

Locations: Home, The Colony, Texas, United States

Data source: Backyard

Description

This is Messier 106, an intermediate spiral galaxy in Canes Venatici about 23.5 million light years away. This galaxy is unusual in that its active central black hole—36 million times the mass of the sun and nine times the mass of the Milky Way’s central black hole—may primarily account for the galaxy’s odd shape. The usual reason for this kind of galactic misshapenness is some kind of gravitational interaction with another galaxy in the past. But apparently not in this case—at least, not directly.

An active galactic nucleus containing a supermassive black hole like this one usually emits powerful jets of accelerated particles at right angles to the galactic disk. But this nucleus seems to be spewing its jets into the spiral arms of the galaxy, causing the odd shape we now see. No one really knows why. Perhaps, after all, it’s because of some primordial gravitational interaction with another galaxy that tilted the nucleus on its side.

Information credit: Annals of the Deep Sky, Volume 3, Kanipe & Webb (2016).

Comments

Revisions

  • M106, 



    
        

            Timothy Martin & Nic Patridge
    Original
  • Final
    M106, 



    
        

            Timothy Martin & Nic Patridge
    B

B

Description: More reprocessing based on Ron Brecher's PixInsight instruction.

Uploaded: ...

Sky plot

Sky plot

Histogram

M106, 



    
        

            Timothy Martin & Nic Patridge