Hemisphere:  Northern  ·  Constellation: Cancer (Cnc)  ·  Contains:  PK208+33.1

Image of the day 01/19/2022

Getting plate-solving status, please wait...
    Abell 30, 



    
        

            Peter Goodhew
    Powered byPixInsight

    Image of the day 01/19/2022

    Getting plate-solving status, please wait...
      Abell 30, 



    
        

            Peter Goodhew
      Powered byPixInsight
      Imaging Telescopes Or Lenses
      APM Telescopes TMB - LZOS Apo refractor 152/1200
      Imaging Cameras
      QSI 6120wsg-8
      Mounts
      10Micron GM2000HPS II
      Filters
      Green · Astrodon Blue · Red · Astrodon OIII 3 nm · Astrodon 5nm H-Alpha filter
      Guiding Cameras
      Starlight Xpress Lodestar X2

      Acquisition details

      Frames:
      Astrodon 5nm H-Alpha filter: 34x900" (8h 30') bin 1x1
      Astrodon Blue: 34x300" (2h 50') bin 1x1
      Astrodon OIII 3 nm: 342x900" (85h 30') bin 1x1
      Astrodon Red: 36x300" (3h) bin 1x1
      Green: 34x300" (2h 50') bin 1x1
      Integration:
      102h 40'

      RA center: 08h46m53s.162

      DEC center: +17°5243.00

      Pixel scale: 0.265 arcsec/pixel

      Orientation: 1.375 degrees

      Field radius: 0.211 degrees

      WCS transformation: thin plate spline

      More info:Open 

      Resolution: 4804x3123

      Locations: e-Eye, Fregenal de la Sierra, Extramadura, Spain

      Data source: Own remote observatory

      Remote source: e-EyE Extremadura

      Description

      Abell 30 is a small (127 arc seconds) extremely faint planetary nebula located approximately 5,500 light-years away in the constellation of Cancer.  Abell 30 is one of just three known nebulae called born-again planetary nebulae. Very rarely, nuclear reactions within the vicinity of a white dwarf can heat the gases to such high temperatures that the tiny star briefly becomes a red giant once more. This is a very brief phase, lasting a mere 20 years or so.  The original nebula is estimated to be around 12,500 years old (which in itself is very brief in astronomical terms). The tiny features in the centre of the bubble are evidence of this re-birth. They are most probably comprised of helium and carbon-rich materials and were ejected around 850 years ago.

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      Abell 30, 



    
        

            Peter Goodhew