Hemisphere:  Northern  ·  Constellation: Hercules (Her)  ·  Contains:  Hercules Globular Cluster  ·  M 13  ·  NGC 6205  ·  NGC 6207
Getting plate-solving status, please wait...
The Great Hercules Cluster M 13 - Now and then, 



    
        

            Stefan Böckler
The Great Hercules Cluster M 13 - Now and then
Powered byPixInsight

The Great Hercules Cluster M 13 - Now and then

Getting plate-solving status, please wait...
The Great Hercules Cluster M 13 - Now and then, 



    
        

            Stefan Böckler
The Great Hercules Cluster M 13 - Now and then
Powered byPixInsight

The Great Hercules Cluster M 13 - Now and then

Acquisition details

Dates:
June 13, 2021 ·  June 14, 2021
Frames:
Optolong UV/IR cut: 108×180(5h 24′) ISO800
Integration:
5h 24′
Flats:
30
Flat darks:
30
Avg. Moon age:
3.28 days
Avg. Moon phase:
11.88%
Bortle Dark-Sky Scale:
4.00

Basic astrometry details

Astrometry.net job: 4630942

RA center: 16h41m45s.1

DEC center: +36°2840

Pixel scale: 1.404 arcsec/pixel

Orientation: 79.835 degrees

Field radius: 0.865 degrees

Resolution: 3767x2343

File size: 676.0 KB

Data source: Backyard

Description

M13 was the first DSO I tried to capture back in August of 2019. You can see the result in image B. It has been the first time for me using a DSLR, APT or a telescope with an equatorial mount (had only used a Dobson before).

The mount didn't even have a polar scope at the time, it has still been on delivery. I just tried to center polaris in the opening of the mount were the polar scope should be introduced. Therefore, only 30 second shots were possible. Focus was not spot on either.

Moreover I had no idea I had to process my images... At the time I thought that stacking in DSS would result in the final image. Of course there was a great disappointment when the stack was initially dimmer than a single sub :-) So the stack was only processed in Photoshop with a crude levels adjustment to make anything visible at all. Nobody had told me that something like a stretch or a white balance was a thing... but you know what? I was extremely proud at the end that it worked at all and keen on spending many more nights imaging.

But now I thought it was time to revisit the target to see if I can do better meanwhile. Long story short: I think I did :-) It's amazing to see how the images changed over the two years. And are still changing. Hopefully learning and progress never stop.

Comments