Hemisphere:  Northern  ·  Constellation: Lynx (Lyn)  ·  Contains:  PK164+31.1
Getting plate-solving status, please wait...
PK 164+31.1 - The Headphone Nebula, 



    
        

            Timothy Martin & Nic Patridge
Powered byPixInsight

PK 164+31.1 - The Headphone Nebula

Getting plate-solving status, please wait...
PK 164+31.1 - The Headphone Nebula, 



    
        

            Timothy Martin & Nic Patridge
Powered byPixInsight

PK 164+31.1 - The Headphone Nebula

Imaging telescopes or lenses: Celestron Edge 1100 HD

Imaging cameras: ZWO ASI2400MC Pro

Mounts: Celestron CGX-L

Guiding telescopes or lenses: Celestron OAG

Guiding cameras: ZWO ASI174MM

Software: Topaz Labs DenoiseAI  ·  Nighttime Imaging 'N' Astronomy N.I.N.A. 1.10  ·  Aries Productions Astro Pixel Precessor v1.082  ·  Open PHD Guiding PHD2 2.6.9  ·  Pixinsight 1.8  ·  Topaz Labs Topaz Studio II  ·  Adobe Photoshop CC 2020

Filters: Baader UV/IR Cut

Accessory: Celestron Focus Motor  ·  Pegasus Astro Powerbox Advanced


Dates:Nov. 18, 2020

Frames:Baader UV/IR Cut: 5x180" (15') (gain: 210.00) -8C bin 1x1

Integration: 15'

Darks: ~30

Flats: ~50

Flat darks: ~50

Avg. Moon age: 3.68 days

Avg. Moon phase: 14.59%

Bortle Dark-Sky Scale: 1.00


Astrometry.net job: 4158133

RA center: 7h 57' 49"

DEC center: +53° 25' 5"

Pixel scale: 0.441 arcsec/pixel

Orientation: -2.685 degrees

Field radius: 0.302 degrees


Resolution: 4144x2640

Locations: Marathon Motel, Marathon, Texas, United States

Data source: Traveller

Description

This is the Headphone Nebula, designated Jones-Emberson 1 (PK164+31.1). This is a planetary nebula located in the Lynx constellation about 1,500 light years away. As with all planetary nebulas, this represents the future of our solar system and the small blue-white star at the center of this photograph is a white dwarf that represents the future of our sun. Planetary nebulas are generally beautiful, small, and short-lived by astronomical standards--roughly 10,000 to 20,000 years of life before they fade into the void. But those short lives are meaningful because they provide much of the oxygen, nitrogen, sulphur, silicon, and other heavier elements that ultimately contribute to planetary formation in our galaxy.

I only had 15 minutes to shoot this before the sun came up, so improvement is definitely possible on this target. I was trying to squeeze in everything I possibly could on the Big Bend trip.

Comments

Sky plot

Sky plot

Histogram

PK 164+31.1 - The Headphone Nebula, 



    
        

            Timothy Martin & Nic Patridge