Hemisphere:  Northern  ·  Constellation: Lynx (Lyn)
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100 hours of Planetary Nebula PuWe 1, 



    
        

            Ross Walker

100 hours of Planetary Nebula PuWe 1

Getting plate-solving status, please wait...
100 hours of Planetary Nebula PuWe 1, 



    
        

            Ross Walker

100 hours of Planetary Nebula PuWe 1

Equipment

Imaging Telescopes Or Lenses
TS OPTICS Photoline 130 F/7 Triplet APO
Imaging Cameras
ZWO ASI1600MM Pro
Mounts
Sky-Watcher EQ8 · iOptron CEM60
Filters
Chroma OIII (3nm) · Chroma Ha (3nm)
Accessories
TS Optics PHOTOLINE 3" 0.79x Reducer/Flattener
Software
PixInsight · Sequence Generator Pro
Guiding Telescopes Or Lenses
TS OPTICS Photoline 130 F/7 Triplet APO
Guiding Cameras
ZWO ASI120MM-Mini

Acquisition details

Dates:
Nov. 16, 2019
Frames:
Chroma Ha (3nm): 609x360" (60h 54') (gain: 139.00) -25°C bin 1x1
Chroma OIII (3nm): 393x360" (39h 18') (gain: 139.00) -25°C bin 1x1
Integration:
100h 12'
Avg. Moon age:
18.62 days
Avg. Moon phase:
84.07%
Bortle Dark-Sky Scale:
5.00
Mean SQM:
19.60

Basic astrometry details

Astrometry.net job: 3449759

RA center: 06h19m32s.4

DEC center: +55°3730

Pixel scale: 1.058 arcsec/pixel

Orientation: 89.142 degrees

Field radius: 0.802 degrees

Resolution: 4381x3259

Locations: Home observatory, Otsu, Shiga, Japan

Data source: Backyard

Description

Please say hello to the planetary nebula Purgathofer-Weinberger 1 (PuWe 1). This giant, circular, low surface brightness nebula, located in the constellation of Lynx, is one of the largest planetary nebulae in our skies, and was discovered in 1980 by A. Purgathofer and R. Weinberger while they were searching Palomar sky survey (POSS E) plates. Their published paper on this discovery can be found here.

The central star is thought to be the white dwarf WD0615+556, the blue member of a red/blue optical double star; you can see them both at the centre of my image above.

With the light domes of Osaka to the south, Kyoto to the west, and Otsu to the east, 100 hours of data does not go far in these Bortle 5 skies. PuWe 1 is only faintly visible in a 6 minute Ha sub, and nothing is visibly in an OIII sub of the same duration. Purgathofer and Weinberger estimate its surface brightnesses to be 23.7 mag/arc-sec² and 26.3 mag/arc-sec² respectively, so we're talking faint! Its distance from earth is similar to that of the Helix Nebula, and based on this and its large diameter of around 1,200 arc-seconds, it is, quote, "a remarkably old nebula".

Imaged over six months from November 2019 to April 2020, PuWe 1 is presented here as an Ha/OIII/OIII combination.

Other IDs:

Purgathofer-Weinberger 1;

Gaia DR2 997854527884948992;

PK 158+17 1;

PN G158.9+17.8;

PN PuWe 1;

WD 0615+556;

1SWASP J061934.22+553642.9;

Comments

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100 hours of Planetary Nebula PuWe 1, 



    
        

            Ross Walker