Contains:  Solar system body or event

Image of the day 08/26/2016

    Hesiodus A, 



    
        

             Astroavani - Avani Soares

    Hesiodus A

    Image of the day 08/26/2016

      Hesiodus A, 



    
        

             Astroavani - Avani Soares

      Hesiodus A

      Technical card


      Resolution: 1000x726

      Locations: Observatório Parsec, Canoas, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

      Description

      The Hesiodus
      For some time I was looking for a decent photo of this crater, photo such that show without a doubt its hallmark.
      The Craters Concentric, or DC, are smaller Moon features that have been ignored at least for some 30 years. But now some scientists examined these features again. David Trang University of Hawaii and colleagues Jeff Gillis-Davis, Ray Hawke and Ben Bussey, published and recently presented a paper at Lunar & Planetary Science Conference, where they describe what they found 14 more CCs than in a previous list made 30 years ago, using it for data from Clementine, Kaguya and LRO probes to distinguish and confirm the identified features. Almost all the researchers now agree that the main crater is a small impact crater, normal, and the question is whether the inner ring or torus is formed in association with the impact or is the result of some endogenic modification (endogenic is a word that it means that something was internally created rather than created by external forces). The group of David found evidence against the hypothesis that the torus is formed by a simultaneous double layered impact in the target by volcanic or viscous relaxation. They noted that the distribution of CC along the edges of the sea is very similar to the fractured inside craters. As it is believed that the interior Fractured craters are impact craters modified by igneous intrusions, they proposed without details that these intrusions can also modify the interior of CCs. This is consistent with evidence that the CCs have a spectral signature virtually identical to the material located beyond the crater rim, implying that there was at least this point, volcanic extrusions. David showed that with the crater CC Firmicus C 14 km in diameter, as a suggestive example of volcanic material can be associated with CC but mostly is not visible. The small dark spot on the torus seems to be pyroclastic excavated by small impact crater. It will be interesting to follow the work of these researchers and see if they will be able to find the same type of feature in other CCs and if they can develop an explanation of how an intrusion would create the morphology of the CC.
      Source: Space Today
      Adaptation and text: Avani Soares

      Comments

      Histogram

      Hesiodus A, 



    
        

             Astroavani - Avani Soares